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Iconic Obama poster based on Reuters photo

Shepard Fairey's posters of Obama became the iconic image of the historic campaign. After a bit of digging by a photographer and a blogger, it turns out that Fairey’s source material was a photo by a Reuters photographer. REUTERS/Jim Young

Shepard Fairey's posters of Obama became the iconic image of the historic campaign. After a bit of digging by a photographer and a blogger, it turns out that Fairey’s source material was a photo by a Reuters photographer. REUTERS/Jim Young

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Reuters' veteran photographer Jim Young took this photo of Senator Obama listening to testimony during confirmation hearings for Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte on Capitol Hill in January of 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young

Reuters' veteran photographer Jim Young took this photo of Senator Obama listening to testimony during confirmation hearings for Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte on Capitol Hill in January of 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young

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Blogger Michael Cramer created this composite after sifting through countless images to find a match. The poster has Obama facing the opposite direction; Cramer flipped it to correspond with the original source photo. Although unconfirmed directly by the artist, many blogs are reporting that Fairey based his iconic image on the original Reuters photograph. REUTERS/Michael Cramer

Blogger Michael Cramer created this composite after sifting through countless images to find a match. The poster has Obama facing the opposite direction; Cramer flipped it to correspond with the original source photo. Although unconfirmed directly by the artist, many blogs are reporting that Fairey based his iconic image on the original Reuters photograph. REUTERS/Michael Cramer

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Ironically, Young unknowingly took several pictures of the poster on the campaign trail, including one through a window when it was flipped to match the orientation of his original photo. REUTERS/Jim Young

Ironically, Young unknowingly took several pictures of the poster on the campaign trail, including one through a window when it was flipped to match the orientation of his original photo. REUTERS/Jim Young

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“I saw that poster all over the place, all year. For a lot of people it symbolized the campaign. It meant so much to so many people,” Young told Philadelphia Inquirer photographer and blogger Tom Gralish, who has led the search for the photo. REUTERS/Jim Young

“I saw that poster all over the place, all year. For a lot of people it symbolized the campaign. It meant so much to so many people,” Young told Philadelphia Inquirer photographer and blogger Tom Gralish, who has led the search for the photo. REUTERS/Jim Young

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“I’m honored, but I’m glad it didn’t come out until after the campaign,” Jim added. “I think even if I had known it was mine, I would have kept quiet. It would be just my little secret.” REUTERS/Composite

“I’m honored, but I’m glad it didn’t come out until after the campaign,” Jim added. “I think even if I had known it was mine, I would have kept quiet. It would be just my little secret.” REUTERS/Composite

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