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Pictures | Thu Oct 1, 2009 | 4:05pm EDT

In exile with Zelaya

<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya greets supporters inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. Zelaya took refuge inside the embassy in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya greets supporters inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. Zelaya took refuge inside the embassy in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya greets supporters inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. Zelaya took refuge inside the embassy in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya greets supporters inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya greets supporters inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya greets supporters inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone inside the Brazilian embassy after his arrival in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya cheer as he arrives outside the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya cheer as he arrives outside the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya cheer as he arrives outside the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya welcome him outside the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya welcome him outside the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya welcome him outside the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone after arriving at the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone after arriving at the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone after arriving at the embassy of Brazil in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks to a local television reporter inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks to a local television reporter inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks to a local television reporter inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 21, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya are seen on a roof outside the Brazilian embassy after police fired tear gas, in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya are seen on a roof outside the Brazilian embassy after police fired tear gas, in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya are seen on a roof outside the Brazilian embassy after police fired tear gas, in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya cover their faces as they react to the tear gas fired upon them by police, inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya cover their faces as they react to the tear gas fired upon them by police, inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya cover their faces as they react to the tear gas fired upon them by police, inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Soldiers walk after dispersing supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya, outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Soldiers walk after dispersing supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya, outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Soldiers walk after dispersing supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya, outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya sleeps inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya sleeps inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya sleeps inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Xiomara Castro, wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, speaks on the phone inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas </p>

Xiomara Castro, wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, speaks on the phone inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas

Xiomara Castro, wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, speaks on the phone inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks with the media as supporters sit around him at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks with the media as supporters sit around him at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks with the media as supporters sit around him at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya prays outside the door of the room where Zelaya has taken refuge in at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A supporter of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya prays outside the door of the room where Zelaya has taken refuge in at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya prays outside the door of the room where Zelaya has taken refuge in at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Medics deliver medicine to supporters of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya who are inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Medics deliver medicine to supporters of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya who are inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Medics deliver medicine to supporters of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya who are inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Xiomara Castro, the wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, speaks with a lawyer of human rights inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Xiomara Castro, the wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, speaks with a lawyer of human rights inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Xiomara Castro, the wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, speaks with a lawyer of human rights inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya washes his clothes inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya washes his clothes inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya washes his clothes inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya are seen inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya are seen inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya are seen inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya points next to the priest Andres Tamayo before a mass at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya points next to the priest Andres Tamayo before a mass at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya points next to the priest Andres Tamayo before a mass at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rests on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rests on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rests on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya hangs her clothes after washing them inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya hangs her clothes after washing them inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya hangs her clothes after washing them inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya form a human chain to transport groceries to inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya form a human chain to transport groceries to inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya form a human chain to transport groceries to inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone after a meeting with presidential candidates inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone after a meeting with presidential candidates inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on the phone after a meeting with presidential candidates inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 24, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rest on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 25, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rest on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 25, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rest on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 25, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Xiomara Castro, wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, stands atop a ladder as she argues with soldiers who are outside Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 25, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Xiomara Castro, wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, stands atop a ladder as she argues with soldiers who are outside Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 25, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Xiomara Castro, wife of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya, stands atop a ladder as she argues with soldiers who are outside Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 25, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Soldiers patrol in a neighbourhood near the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Soldiers patrol in a neighbourhood near the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Soldiers patrol in a neighbourhood near the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Police officers keep watch in a neighbourhood near the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Police officers keep watch in a neighbourhood near the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Police officers keep watch in a neighbourhood near the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A policeman inspects the diplomatic passport of Francisco Catunda, charge d'affaires of the Brazilian embassy, as he leaves the compound in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A policeman inspects the diplomatic passport of Francisco Catunda, charge d'affaires of the Brazilian embassy, as he leaves the compound in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A policeman inspects the diplomatic passport of Francisco Catunda, charge d'affaires of the Brazilian embassy, as he leaves the compound in Tegucigalpa September 26, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya holds his Stetson cowboy hat during a mass inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya holds his Stetson cowboy hat during a mass inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya holds his Stetson cowboy hat during a mass inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya braids another supporters hair as a machete lies on the wall, inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya braids another supporters hair as a machete lies on the wall, inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya braids another supporters hair as a machete lies on the wall, inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya looks through a window inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya looks through a window inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya looks through a window inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A soldier with a mask is seen through a window as he stands guard outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A soldier with a mask is seen through a window as he stands guard outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A soldier with a mask is seen through a window as he stands guard outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Soldiers paint over graffiti reading "Mel (Zelaya) President" outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. The other parts of the graffiti reads, "The people is writing his story. No more coups." REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Soldiers paint over graffiti reading "Mel (Zelaya) President" outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. The other parts of the graffiti reads, "The people is writing his story. No more coups." REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Soldiers paint over graffiti reading "Mel (Zelaya) President" outside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 27, 2009. The other parts of the graffiti reads, "The people is writing his story. No more coups." REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya gestures during a news conference inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 27, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya gestures during a news conference inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya gestures during a news conference inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 27, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya and his wife Xiomara Castro take part in a mass inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 28, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya and his wife Xiomara Castro take part in a mass inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 28, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya and his wife Xiomara Castro take part in a mass inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa September 28, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on a phone inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 28, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on a phone inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 28, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya speaks on a phone inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 28, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rests on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rests on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rests on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya wash the floors inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya wash the floors inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya wash the floors inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya washes his hair with a hose inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya washes his hair with a hose inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A supporter of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya washes his hair with a hose inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Police and soldiers check a car as a member of the Brazilian embassy leaves the embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Police and soldiers check a car as a member of the Brazilian embassy leaves the embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Police and soldiers check a car as a member of the Brazilian embassy leaves the embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya takes off his hat before a news conference inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya takes off his hat before a news conference inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya takes off his hat before a news conference inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya wave inside a car as they leave the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya wave inside a car as they leave the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya wave inside a car as they leave the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 29, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya dance inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009.  REUTERS/Edgard Garrido </p>

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya dance inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya dance inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rest on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009, where Zelaya has taken refuge since his return to Honduras. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rest on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009, where Zelaya has taken refuge since his return to Honduras. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Supporters of Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya rest on the floor inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009, where Zelaya has taken refuge since his return to Honduras. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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<p>Xiomara Castro holds the hand of her husband Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya (R) during the celebration of her birthday inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009, where Zelaya has taken refuge since his return to Honduras. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido</p>

Xiomara Castro holds the hand of her husband Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya (R) during the celebration of her birthday inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009, where Zelaya has taken refuge since his return to...more

Xiomara Castro holds the hand of her husband Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya (R) during the celebration of her birthday inside the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, September 30, 2009, where Zelaya has taken refuge since his return to Honduras. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

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