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Insight: Comeback cod lessens gloom over emptying oceans

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ALISTER DOYLE

A fishing boat returns from a trip to the Barents Sea to the tiny port of Sommaroya, north Norway January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

A fishing boat returns from a trip to the Barents Sea to the tiny port of Sommaroya, north Norway January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Picture shows fish caught as bycatch by the Haunes trawler after a day trip for cod in the Barents Sea off north Norway January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Picture shows fish caught as bycatch by the Haunes trawler after a day trip for cod in the Barents Sea off north Norway January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Discarded heads of hundreds of cod caught in the Arctic Barents Sea lie in a plastic container at a fish processing plant near Sommaroya, north Norway January 31, 2013. Cod quotas in the Barents Sea are at a record high despite a global crisis for fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Discarded heads of hundreds of cod caught in the Arctic Barents Sea lie in a plastic container at a fish processing plant near Sommaroya, north Norway January 31, 2013. Cod quotas in the Barents Sea are at a record high despite a global crisis for fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Cod is unloaded from the Haunes trawler at a fish processing plant near Sommaroya, north Norway January 31, 2013. The Haunes caught 2 tonnes of fish in one day -- the area is teeming with fish as part of a record quota for 2013. A cod bonanza off north Norway and Russia and recovery of some fish stocks off developed nations from the United States to Australia have led many scientists to say the future for over-fished world stocks...more

Cod is unloaded from the Haunes trawler at a fish processing plant near Sommaroya, north Norway January 31, 2013. The Haunes caught 2 tonnes of fish in one day -- the area is teeming with fish as part of a record quota for 2013. A cod bonanza off north Norway and Russia and recovery of some fish stocks off developed nations from the United States to Australia have led many scientists to say the future for over-fished world stocks is a bit less bleak. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Norwegian fisherman Trond Ludvigsen shows off a cod, bleeding to death after he slit the arteries behind its gills, on a trawler as snow falls in the Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Norwegian fisherman Trond Ludvigsen shows off a cod, bleeding to death after he slit the arteries behind its gills, on a trawler as snow falls in the Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Norwegian fishermen Trond Ludvigsen (L) and his brother Kurt sort fish after a trip to catch cod in the Arctic Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas for 2013 are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Norwegian fishermen Trond Ludvigsen (L) and his brother Kurt sort fish after a trip to catch cod in the Arctic Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas for 2013 are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Norwegian fisherman Trond Ludvigsen holds a cod fish caught on a trip to the Arctic Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas for 2013 are at a record high off north Norway despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Norwegian fisherman Trond Ludvigsen holds a cod fish caught on a trip to the Arctic Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas for 2013 are at a record high off north Norway despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Norwegian fisherman Kurt Ludvigsen (L) disentangles nets aboard the Haunes trawler as his brother Trond throws a cod into an onboard storage tank as snow falls in the Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Norwegian fisherman Kurt Ludvigsen (L) disentangles nets aboard the Haunes trawler as his brother Trond throws a cod into an onboard storage tank as snow falls in the Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod quotas off north Norway are at a record high despite a crisis for world fish stocks. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Photographer
ALISTER DOYLE

Norwegian fisherman Trond Ludvigsen shows off a cod after a fishing trip to the Arctic Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod tongues are a delicacy in Norway. A cod bonanza off north Norway and Russia and recovery of some fish stocks off developed nations from the United States to Australia have led many scientists to say the future for over-fished world stocks is a bit less bleak. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Norwegian fisherman Trond Ludvigsen shows off a cod after a fishing trip to the Arctic Barents Sea January 31, 2013. Cod tongues are a delicacy in Norway. A cod bonanza off north Norway and Russia and recovery of some fish stocks off developed nations from the United States to Australia have led many scientists to say the future for over-fished world stocks is a bit less bleak. Picture taken January 31, 2013. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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