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Pictures | Tue Feb 26, 2013 | 8:20am EST

Insight: In Spain, banks buck calls for mortgage law reform

A man uses an ATM machine at a La Caixa savings bank branch close to a drawing of a hangman with the word "Desahucio" (eviction) spelled out, in central Madrid in this November 19, 2012 file photo. REUTERS/Juan Medina/Files

A man uses an ATM machine at a La Caixa savings bank branch close to a drawing of a hangman with the word "Desahucio" (eviction) spelled out, in central Madrid in this November 19, 2012 file photo. REUTERS/Juan Medina/Files

A man uses an ATM machine at a La Caixa savings bank branch close to a drawing of a hangman with the word "Desahucio" (eviction) spelled out, in central Madrid in this November 19, 2012 file photo. REUTERS/Juan Medina/Files
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Anti-eviction protesters attend a demonstration in central Madrid in this February 16, 2013 file photo. REUTERS/Javier Barbancho/Files

Anti-eviction protesters attend a demonstration in central Madrid in this February 16, 2013 file photo. REUTERS/Javier Barbancho/Files

Anti-eviction protesters attend a demonstration in central Madrid in this February 16, 2013 file photo. REUTERS/Javier Barbancho/Files
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A woman shouts outside a Bankia bank branch as policemen stand guard during an anti-eviction protest in Madrid in this June 1, 2012 file photo. REUTERS/Andrea Comas/Files

A woman shouts outside a Bankia bank branch as policemen stand guard during an anti-eviction protest in Madrid in this June 1, 2012 file photo. REUTERS/Andrea Comas/Files

A woman shouts outside a Bankia bank branch as policemen stand guard during an anti-eviction protest in Madrid in this June 1, 2012 file photo. REUTERS/Andrea Comas/Files
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Marcheline Rosero (2nd L), 45, disabled from the effects of polio as a child in Ecuador, meets with a support group at the "self-managed liberated sociocultural space (EKO)," a public space for social use, in Madrid February 7, 2013. REUTERS/Juan Medina

Marcheline Rosero (2nd L), 45, disabled from the effects of polio as a child in Ecuador, meets with a support group at the "self-managed liberated sociocultural space (EKO)," a public space for social use, in Madrid February 7, 2013. REUTERS/Juan...more

Marcheline Rosero (2nd L), 45, disabled from the effects of polio as a child in Ecuador, meets with a support group at the "self-managed liberated sociocultural space (EKO)," a public space for social use, in Madrid February 7, 2013. REUTERS/Juan Medina
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Marcheline Rosero, 45, disabled from the effects of polio as a child in Ecuador, sits on her bed in her flat in Madrid December 17, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Medina

Marcheline Rosero, 45, disabled from the effects of polio as a child in Ecuador, sits on her bed in her flat in Madrid December 17, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Medina

Marcheline Rosero, 45, disabled from the effects of polio as a child in Ecuador, sits on her bed in her flat in Madrid December 17, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Medina
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Jenifer Martinez (L) of Spain and Jorge Sanchez of Colombia wait for the judicial commission, before learning that their family's eviction has been suspended, in their home in Madrid December 3, 2012. For more than a century, Spanish law has determined that if a person borrows money to buy a home, they can only be freed of the debt when it is repaid. Even in death, the debt is not cancelled. As the country enters another year of recession, calls are mounting for the system to be relaxed. But the banks worry this would damage their access to funds. Picture taken December 3, 2012. To match Insight SPAIN/MORTGAGE-REFORM REUTERS/Juan Medina (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)

Jenifer Martinez (L) of Spain and Jorge Sanchez of Colombia wait for the judicial commission, before learning that their family's eviction has been suspended, in their home in Madrid December 3, 2012. For more than a century, Spanish law has...more

Jenifer Martinez (L) of Spain and Jorge Sanchez of Colombia wait for the judicial commission, before learning that their family's eviction has been suspended, in their home in Madrid December 3, 2012. For more than a century, Spanish law has determined that if a person borrows money to buy a home, they can only be freed of the debt when it is repaid. Even in death, the debt is not cancelled. As the country enters another year of recession, calls are mounting for the system to be relaxed. But the banks worry this would damage their access to funds. Picture taken December 3, 2012. To match Insight SPAIN/MORTGAGE-REFORM REUTERS/Juan Medina (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
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Vicente Torres (L) is comforted by his grandson Jonathan as his sister-in-law Maria looks on, after learning that his eviction was suspended until May 3, in Madrid in this April 18, 2012 file photo. Vicente, a severely ill 74-year-old pensioner, faced an eviction after falling to pay mortgage as guarantor of his son, who has already been evicted from his home. For more than a century, Spanish law has determined that if a person borrows money to buy a home, they can only be freed of the debt when it is repaid. Even in death, the debt is not cancelled. As the country enters another year of recession, calls are mounting for the system to be relaxed. But the banks worry this would damage their access to funds. Picture taken April 18, 2012. To match Insight SPAIN/MORTGAGE-REFORM REUTERS/Juan Medina/Files (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)

Vicente Torres (L) is comforted by his grandson Jonathan as his sister-in-law Maria looks on, after learning that his eviction was suspended until May 3, in Madrid in this April 18, 2012 file photo. Vicente, a severely ill 74-year-old pensioner,...more

Vicente Torres (L) is comforted by his grandson Jonathan as his sister-in-law Maria looks on, after learning that his eviction was suspended until May 3, in Madrid in this April 18, 2012 file photo. Vicente, a severely ill 74-year-old pensioner, faced an eviction after falling to pay mortgage as guarantor of his son, who has already been evicted from his home. For more than a century, Spanish law has determined that if a person borrows money to buy a home, they can only be freed of the debt when it is repaid. Even in death, the debt is not cancelled. As the country enters another year of recession, calls are mounting for the system to be relaxed. But the banks worry this would damage their access to funds. Picture taken April 18, 2012. To match Insight SPAIN/MORTGAGE-REFORM REUTERS/Juan Medina/Files (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
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Juan Carlos Castano, 43, turns on the TV in his emptied-out bedroom as he waits for the judicial commission to carry out his eviction in Madrid in this September 28, 2012 file photo. Castano, a Spanish national who came from his native Colombia to Spain in 2000, stopped making mortgage payments after becoming unemployed in late 2009. For more than a century, Spanish law has determined that if a person borrows money to buy a home, they can only be freed of the debt when it is repaid. Even in death, the debt is not cancelled. As the country enters another year of recession, calls are mounting for the system to be relaxed. But the banks worry this would damage their access to funds. Picture taken September 28, 2012. To match Insight SPAIN/MORTGAGE-REFORM REUTERS/Susana Vera/Files (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)

Juan Carlos Castano, 43, turns on the TV in his emptied-out bedroom as he waits for the judicial commission to carry out his eviction in Madrid in this September 28, 2012 file photo. Castano, a Spanish national who came from his native Colombia to...more

Juan Carlos Castano, 43, turns on the TV in his emptied-out bedroom as he waits for the judicial commission to carry out his eviction in Madrid in this September 28, 2012 file photo. Castano, a Spanish national who came from his native Colombia to Spain in 2000, stopped making mortgage payments after becoming unemployed in late 2009. For more than a century, Spanish law has determined that if a person borrows money to buy a home, they can only be freed of the debt when it is repaid. Even in death, the debt is not cancelled. As the country enters another year of recession, calls are mounting for the system to be relaxed. But the banks worry this would damage their access to funds. Picture taken September 28, 2012. To match Insight SPAIN/MORTGAGE-REFORM REUTERS/Susana Vera/Files (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
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