Thomson Reuters

Insight: Swiss, facing EU tax pressure, ponder how to attract firms

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Photographer
DENIS BALIBOUSE

The A-One Business Centre is pictured in Rolle, 30 km (19 miles) east of Geneva, December12, 2012. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

The A-One Business Centre is pictured in Rolle, 30 km (19 miles) east of Geneva, December12, 2012. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
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Photographer
PASCAL LAUENER

Pascal Broulis, finance minister of the Swiss canton of Vaud and author of a 2011 book, "Happy Taxation", poses for a photographer with his book in Bern December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Pascal Lauener

Pascal Broulis, finance minister of the Swiss canton of Vaud and author of a 2011 book, "Happy Taxation", poses for a photographer with his book in Bern December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Pascal Lauener
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Photographer
MICHAEL BUHOLZER

A logo of the Swiss mining company Xstrata is shown at their headquarters in Zug in this March 26, 2008 file picture. REUTERS/Michael Buholzer/Files

A logo of the Swiss mining company Xstrata is shown at their headquarters in Zug in this March 26, 2008 file picture. REUTERS/Michael Buholzer/Files
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Photographer
DENIS BALIBOUSE

Brazilian mining company Vale's central sales office is pictured in Saint-Prex near Geneva in this June 4, 2012 file picture. Cash-strapped foreign governments have already chipped away at the secrecy that allows rich individuals to store tax-free funds in Swiss bank accounts. Now Europe's governments have turned the spotlight on the incentives Switzerland offers companies. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/Files

Brazilian mining company Vale's central sales office is pictured in Saint-Prex near Geneva in this June 4, 2012 file picture. Cash-strapped foreign governments have already chipped away at the secrecy that allows rich individuals to store tax-free funds in Swiss bank accounts. Now Europe's governments have turned the spotlight on the incentives Switzerland offers companies. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/Files
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Photographer
DENIS BALIBOUSE

A Yahoo logo is pictured in front of a building in Rolle, 30 km (19 miles) east of Geneva, December12, 2012. Cash-strapped foreign governments have already chipped away at the secrecy that allows rich individuals to store tax-free funds in Swiss bank accounts. Now Europe's governments have turned the spotlight on the incentives Switzerland offers companies. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

A Yahoo logo is pictured in front of a building in Rolle, 30 km (19 miles) east of Geneva, December12, 2012. Cash-strapped foreign governments have already chipped away at the secrecy that allows rich individuals to store tax-free funds in Swiss bank accounts. Now Europe's governments have turned the spotlight on the incentives Switzerland offers companies. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
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Photographer
ROMINA AMATO

Swiss commodities trader Glencore's logo is seen in front of its headquarters in Baar, near Zurich, in this February 6, 2012 file picture. REUTERS/Romina Amato/Files

Swiss commodities trader Glencore's logo is seen in front of its headquarters in Baar, near Zurich, in this February 6, 2012 file picture. REUTERS/Romina Amato/Files
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