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Intel bets big on thin PCs and phones at Las Vegas show

Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, speaks at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, speaks at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, speaks at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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A man tries out a Monopoly game on a Lenovo's IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC during an Intel news conference at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

A man tries out a Monopoly game on a Lenovo's IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC during an Intel news conference at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

A man tries out a Monopoly game on a Lenovo's IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC during an Intel news conference at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, holds an Acer Aspire detachable Ultrabook at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, holds an Acer Aspire detachable Ultrabook at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags:...more

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, holds an Acer Aspire detachable Ultrabook at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, announces new Intel processors at a news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced a variety of improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. Intel also announced the availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, announces new Intel processors at a news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced a variety of improvements to its processors...more

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, announces new Intel processors at a news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced a variety of improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. Intel also announced the availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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A convertible Lenovo Ultrabook is displayed at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. Intel also announced the availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

A convertible Lenovo Ultrabook is displayed at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. Intel also...more

A convertible Lenovo Ultrabook is displayed at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. Intel also announced the availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, talks about availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, talks about availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel...more

Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, talks about availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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Mike Bell, vice president of Intel's mobile and communications group, speaks about processors for mobile phones at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

Mike Bell, vice president of Intel's mobile and communications group, speaks about processors for mobile phones at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES -...more

Mike Bell, vice president of Intel's mobile and communications group, speaks about processors for mobile phones at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, converts a Lenovo Yoga Ultrabook into a tablet, at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, converts a Lenovo Yoga Ultrabook into a tablet, at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, converts a Lenovo Yoga Ultrabook into a tablet, at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, compares the thickness of a new NEC Ultrabook (12.8mm thick) and a three-year-old laptop at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. Intel also announced the availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, compares the thickness of a new NEC Ultrabook (12.8mm thick) and a three-year-old laptop at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013....more

Kirk Skaugen, Intel's vice president of PC client group, compares the thickness of a new NEC Ultrabook (12.8mm thick) and a three-year-old laptop at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Intel announced improvements to its processors including one with "all day" battery life. Intel also announced the availability of live and on-demand pay TV content to Intel devices. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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Rigger Matt Gerbracht arranges a display of Ultrabooks powered with Intel processors as workers prepare for the International CES show at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Rigger Matt Gerbracht arranges a display of Ultrabooks powered with Intel processors as workers prepare for the International CES show at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Rigger Matt Gerbracht arranges a display of Ultrabooks powered with Intel processors as workers prepare for the International CES show at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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Mike Bell, vice president of Intel's mobile and communications group, holds a smart phone powered by an Intel processor at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

Mike Bell, vice president of Intel's mobile and communications group, holds a smart phone powered by an Intel processor at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED...more

Mike Bell, vice president of Intel's mobile and communications group, holds a smart phone powered by an Intel processor at an Intel news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, demonstrates touch capability with a Sony all-in-one computer at an Intel press conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, demonstrates touch capability with a Sony all-in-one computer at an Intel press conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Kirk Skaugen, vice president of PC client group for Intel, demonstrates touch capability with a Sony all-in-one computer at an Intel press conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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