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iPad liver surgery

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, performs liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. The tablet computer uses augmented reality, which allows the liver to be filmed with an iPad and overlaid during an operation with virtual 3D models...more

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, performs liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. The tablet computer uses augmented reality, which allows the liver to be filmed with an iPad and overlaid during an operation with virtual 3D models reconstructed from the real organ. Developed by Fraunhofer MEVIS in Bremen, this procedure helps locate critical structures such as tumors and vessels and is expected to improve the quality of transferring pre-operational resection plans into actual surgery. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer (R) chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, helps a team member with his scrubs before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer (R) chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, helps a team member with his scrubs before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer (L) chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, is assisted with his surgical gloves before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer (L) chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, is assisted with his surgical gloves before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer (R) chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, is assisted with his surgical gown before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer (R) chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, is assisted with his surgical gown before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, (2nd L) and his team perform liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013.REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, (2nd L) and his team perform liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013.REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, puts a tablet computer into a sterile bag before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, puts a tablet computer into a sterile bag before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, sews up the liver of the patient after the removal of tumorous tissue during liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, sews up the liver of the patient after the removal of tumorous tissue during liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, performs liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, performs liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Surgeons of the general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, open the abdominal wall of a patient during liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Surgeons of the general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, open the abdominal wall of a patient during liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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A piece of a tumorous liver, which was removed during surgery supported by a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, lies next to a pair of scissors, at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, August 15, 2013.REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

A piece of a tumorous liver, which was removed during surgery supported by a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, lies next to a pair of scissors, at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, August 15, 2013.REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, shows a tumor inside a piece of a liver which was removed during surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, shows a tumor inside a piece of a liver which was removed during surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, poses during liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, poses during liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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A reconstructed liver model with metastases, resection proposals, portal veins (cyan) and hepatic arteries (orange) from the Mobile Liver Explorer app, is seen in this handout screenshot made available by Fraunhofer MEVIS August 16, 2013. REUTERS/Fraunhofer MEVIS

A reconstructed liver model with metastases, resection proposals, portal veins (cyan) and hepatic arteries (orange) from the Mobile Liver Explorer app, is seen in this handout screenshot made available by Fraunhofer MEVIS August 16, 2013. REUTERS/Fraunhofer MEVIS

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, puts a tablet computer into a sterile bag before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, puts a tablet computer into a sterile bag before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, (2nd L) and his team perform liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, (2nd L) and his team perform liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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A piece of a liver is removed during an operation, one of the first surgeries of it's kind in Germany supported by a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

A piece of a liver is removed during an operation, one of the first surgeries of it's kind in Germany supported by a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek in Hamburg, August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, poses before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

Professor Karl Oldhafer, chief physician of general and visceral surgery at the Asklepios Hospital Hamburg-Barmbek, poses before liver surgery, one of the first surgeries of its kind in Germany with the support of a tablet computer to access and visualize planning data, in Hamburg August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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