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Pictures | Tue Dec 11, 2012 | 6:16pm EST

Is South Korea ready for "Madam President"?

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) dances with election campaigners of the party during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) dances with election campaigners of the party during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) dances with election campaigners of the party during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) and election campaigners of the party attend her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) and election campaigners of the party attend her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) and election campaigners of the party attend her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye attends a campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye attends a campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye attends a campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye attends a campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye attends a campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye attends a campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) talks with a woman as she attends a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) talks with a woman as she attends a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) talks with a woman as she attends a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) looks at a baby as she attends a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) looks at a baby as she attends a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) looks at a baby as she attends a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (2nd R) arrives as policemen stand guard to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (2nd R) arrives as policemen stand guard to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (2nd R) arrives as policemen stand guard to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) arrives to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) arrives to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (R) arrives to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) arrives to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) arrives to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean...more

South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (C) arrives to attend a Salvation Army fundraising event, during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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Election campaigners gesture during a campaign of South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (not pictured) in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Election campaigners gesture during a campaign of South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (not pictured) in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military...more

Election campaigners gesture during a campaign of South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (not pictured) in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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Supporters of South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (not pictured) react during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Supporters of South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (not pictured) react during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park...more

Supporters of South Korea's ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye (not pictured) react during her campaign in Seoul December 7, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If Park Geun-hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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Park Geun-hye poses with Chindo puppies at her house in Seoul October 26, 2005. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken October 26, 2005. REUTERS/The parliament office of Park Geun-hye/Handout/Files

Park Geun-hye poses with Chindo puppies at her house in Seoul October 26, 2005. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his...more

Park Geun-hye poses with Chindo puppies at her house in Seoul October 26, 2005. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken October 26, 2005. REUTERS/The parliament office of Park Geun-hye/Handout/Files
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Then head of the Grand National Party, Park Geun-hye arrives at the party headquarters in Seoul in this June 1, 2006 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files

Then head of the Grand National Party, Park Geun-hye arrives at the party headquarters in Seoul in this June 1, 2006 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in...more

Then head of the Grand National Party, Park Geun-hye arrives at the party headquarters in Seoul in this June 1, 2006 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files
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Then former Chairwoman of the Grand National Party, Park Geun-hye (R) poses with Lee Myung-bak, then former Seoul mayor who became President later, at a campaign in Seoul in this August 17, 2007 file picture. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If current ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Han Jae-ho/Files

Then former Chairwoman of the Grand National Party, Park Geun-hye (R) poses with Lee Myung-bak, then former Seoul mayor who became President later, at a campaign in Seoul in this August 17, 2007 file picture. Conservative and right wing Park is the...more

Then former Chairwoman of the Grand National Party, Park Geun-hye (R) poses with Lee Myung-bak, then former Seoul mayor who became President later, at a campaign in Seoul in this August 17, 2007 file picture. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If current ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Han Jae-ho/Files
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Park Geun-hye attends a parliamentary inspection of the Bank of Korea at its headquarters in Seoul in this September 27, 2011 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files

Park Geun-hye attends a parliamentary inspection of the Bank of Korea at its headquarters in Seoul in this September 27, 2011 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took...more

Park Geun-hye attends a parliamentary inspection of the Bank of Korea at its headquarters in Seoul in this September 27, 2011 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files
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Park Geun-hye celebrates at a national convention of the ruling Saenuri Party in Goyang, north of Seoul in this August 20, 2012 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files

Park Geun-hye celebrates at a national convention of the ruling Saenuri Party in Goyang, north of Seoul in this August 20, 2012 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who...more

Park Geun-hye celebrates at a national convention of the ruling Saenuri Party in Goyang, north of Seoul in this August 20, 2012 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files
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Park Geun-hye attends a national convention of the ruling Saenuri Party in Goyang, north of Seoul in this August 20, 2012 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files

Park Geun-hye attends a national convention of the ruling Saenuri Party in Goyang, north of Seoul in this August 20, 2012 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took...more

Park Geun-hye attends a national convention of the ruling Saenuri Party in Goyang, north of Seoul in this August 20, 2012 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/Files
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Park Geun-hye (L) talks with her father, late South Korean President Park Chung-hee, in Seoul in this April 12, 1977 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism/Handout/Files

Park Geun-hye (L) talks with her father, late South Korean President Park Chung-hee, in Seoul in this April 12, 1977 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in...more

Park Geun-hye (L) talks with her father, late South Korean President Park Chung-hee, in Seoul in this April 12, 1977 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism/Handout/Files
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Park Geun-hye (L) uses a writing brush to write calligraphy as her father, the late South Korean President Park Chung-hee, watches in Seoul in this August 31, 1977 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism/Handout/Files

Park Geun-hye (L) uses a writing brush to write calligraphy as her father, the late South Korean President Park Chung-hee, watches in Seoul in this August 31, 1977 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean...more

Park Geun-hye (L) uses a writing brush to write calligraphy as her father, the late South Korean President Park Chung-hee, watches in Seoul in this August 31, 1977 file photo. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. REUTERS/The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism/Handout/Files
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A visitor takes pictures of a painting titled "Golden Time - Dr. Choi In-hyeok Giving a Military Salute to a Newborn Mr. President" by artist Hong Sung-dam at the Space99 Gallery in Seoul November 20, 2012. The painting depicts Park Geun-hye as a mother giving birth to a baby Park Chung Hee, her father. Prosecutors have launched an investigation into the artist later, according to local media. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken November 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji

A visitor takes pictures of a painting titled "Golden Time - Dr. Choi In-hyeok Giving a Military Salute to a Newborn Mr. President" by artist Hong Sung-dam at the Space99 Gallery in Seoul November 20, 2012. The painting depicts Park Geun-hye as a...more

A visitor takes pictures of a painting titled "Golden Time - Dr. Choi In-hyeok Giving a Military Salute to a Newborn Mr. President" by artist Hong Sung-dam at the Space99 Gallery in Seoul November 20, 2012. The painting depicts Park Geun-hye as a mother giving birth to a baby Park Chung Hee, her father. Prosecutors have launched an investigation into the artist later, according to local media. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken November 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji
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A visitor takes pictures of a painting depicting Park Geun-hye dancing with her father Park Chung Hee, wearing a military uniform and black sunglasses, by artist Hong Sung-dam at the Space99 Gallery in Seoul November 20, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken November 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji

A visitor takes pictures of a painting depicting Park Geun-hye dancing with her father Park Chung Hee, wearing a military uniform and black sunglasses, by artist Hong Sung-dam at the Space99 Gallery in Seoul November 20, 2012. Conservative and right...more

A visitor takes pictures of a painting depicting Park Geun-hye dancing with her father Park Chung Hee, wearing a military uniform and black sunglasses, by artist Hong Sung-dam at the Space99 Gallery in Seoul November 20, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken November 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji
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South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (R) of ruling Saenuri Party hands over her bag to her bodyguard before a televised debate in Seoul December 4, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 4, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (R) of ruling Saenuri Party hands over her bag to her bodyguard before a televised debate in Seoul December 4, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military...more

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (R) of ruling Saenuri Party hands over her bag to her bodyguard before a televised debate in Seoul December 4, 2012. Conservative and right wing Park is the daughter of late South Korean military dictator Park Chung-hee who took power in a military coup in 1961 and ruled until his assassination in 1979. If ruling Saenuri Party's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye wins South Korea's presidential election on December 19, 2012 as now looks increasingly likely she will become the first woman to hold the country's top office, challenging stereotypes in a nation that is largely run by men in blue suits. Picture taken December 4, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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Dec 10 2012

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Shooting outside UK parliament

Shooting outside UK parliament

Four people were killed and at least 20 injured in London after a car ploughed into pedestrians and an attacker stabbed a policeman close to the British parliament in what police called a "marauding terrorist attack".

Floods, landslides spread havoc in Peru

Floods, landslides spread havoc in Peru

Severe droughts give way to some of the country's most devastating downpours in decades.

First 100 days of Trump

First 100 days of Trump

Major moments from the first days of the Trump administration.

Persian New Year

Persian New Year

Followers of the Persian calendar celebrate Newroz, marking the arrival of spring and the new year.

Drones in the sky

Drones in the sky

The varied roles of drones.

Welcoming spring

Welcoming spring

Celebrating the spring equinox and the end of winter.

Banksy hotel opens to guests

Banksy hotel opens to guests

The first guests arrive at Banksy's Walled Off Hotel in the West Bank city of Bethlehem.

Mourning Martin McGuinness

Mourning Martin McGuinness

The coffin of the IRA peacemaker is carried through the streets of Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

Iraqi forces edge further into Mosul

Iraqi forces edge further into Mosul

Iraqi forces enter Mosul's Old City as Islamic State militants put up fierce resistance from the close-packed houses and narrow streets.

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