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Pictures | Fri Nov 8, 2013 | 10:45pm EST

Israelis living in Berlin

<p>Israeli Jewish cafe owner Ze'er Avrahami poses in the window of his Israeli cafe "Sababa" in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin November 7, 2013. "I came to Berlin initially for the same reason everyone comes to Berlin, its cheap and there are many parties. But if you are Jewish there is another layer to Berlin you have to explore. Berlin has to do with death of Jewish people. This is the layer of Jewish life that used to exist here in the past. No body talks about it. There was good life here, very intelligent and cultural life. The right life for a Jewish person doesn&acirc;&euro;&trade;t have to do with a nation. The right life is when you live in the diaspora. This is how Jews are supposed to live. My concern is the continuation of Jewish life in the diaspora. What does it mean to live in the diaspora, as a minority? The thrive to be successful. You have to be successful, intelligently, financially. This is lost in Israel where you have nothing to prove," Avrahami said. November 9th marks the 75th anniversary of the 'Kristallnacht' ('crystal night' or also referred to as 'night of broken glass') when Nazi thugs conducted a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms on the streets of Berlin and other cities in 1938. REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Israeli Jewish cafe owner Ze'er Avrahami poses in the window of his Israeli cafe "Sababa" in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin November 7, 2013. "I came to Berlin initially for the same reason everyone comes to Berlin, its cheap and there are...more

Israeli Jewish cafe owner Ze'er Avrahami poses in the window of his Israeli cafe "Sababa" in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin November 7, 2013. "I came to Berlin initially for the same reason everyone comes to Berlin, its cheap and there are many parties. But if you are Jewish there is another layer to Berlin you have to explore. Berlin has to do with death of Jewish people. This is the layer of Jewish life that used to exist here in the past. No body talks about it. There was good life here, very intelligent and cultural life. The right life for a Jewish person doesn’t have to do with a nation. The right life is when you live in the diaspora. This is how Jews are supposed to live. My concern is the continuation of Jewish life in the diaspora. What does it mean to live in the diaspora, as a minority? The thrive to be successful. You have to be successful, intelligently, financially. This is lost in Israel where you have nothing to prove," Avrahami said. November 9th marks the 75th anniversary of the 'Kristallnacht' ('crystal night' or also referred to as 'night of broken glass') when Nazi thugs conducted a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms on the streets of Berlin and other cities in 1938. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Israeli Jewish cafe owner Ze'er Avrahami poses in his Israeli cafe "Sababa" in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin November 7, 2013. "I came to Berlin initially for the same reason everyone comes to Berlin, its cheap and there are many parties. But if you are Jewish there is another layer to Berlin you have to explore. Berlin has to do with death of Jewish people. This is the layer of Jewish life that used to exist here in the past. No body talks about it. There was good life here, very intelligent and cultural life. The right life for a Jewish person doesn&acirc;&euro;&trade;t have to do with a nation. The right life is when you live in the diaspora. This is how Jews are supposed to live. My concern is the continuation of Jewish life in the diaspora. What does it mean to live in the diaspora, as a minority? The thrive to be successful. You have to be successful, intelligently, financially. This is lost in Israel where you have nothing to prove," Avrahami said. November 9th marks the 75th anniversary of the 'Kristallnacht' ('crystal night' or also referred to as 'night of broken glass') when Nazi thugs conducted a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms on the streets of Berlin and other cities in 1938. REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Israeli Jewish cafe owner Ze'er Avrahami poses in his Israeli cafe "Sababa" in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin November 7, 2013. "I came to Berlin initially for the same reason everyone comes to Berlin, its cheap and there are many parties....more

Israeli Jewish cafe owner Ze'er Avrahami poses in his Israeli cafe "Sababa" in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin November 7, 2013. "I came to Berlin initially for the same reason everyone comes to Berlin, its cheap and there are many parties. But if you are Jewish there is another layer to Berlin you have to explore. Berlin has to do with death of Jewish people. This is the layer of Jewish life that used to exist here in the past. No body talks about it. There was good life here, very intelligent and cultural life. The right life for a Jewish person doesn’t have to do with a nation. The right life is when you live in the diaspora. This is how Jews are supposed to live. My concern is the continuation of Jewish life in the diaspora. What does it mean to live in the diaspora, as a minority? The thrive to be successful. You have to be successful, intelligently, financially. This is lost in Israel where you have nothing to prove," Avrahami said. November 9th marks the 75th anniversary of the 'Kristallnacht' ('crystal night' or also referred to as 'night of broken glass') when Nazi thugs conducted a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms on the streets of Berlin and other cities in 1938. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Israeli Jewish web designer Nili Shani works next to her cat Mitze at her office in Berlin November 5, 2013. "I came with my ex-girlfriend to Germany. I had many prejudices at the time. When you grow up in Israel you don't think great about Germany. I do now, but at the time there was fear and prejudice, she said. Apart from once, when she felt threatened by members of a motorcycle gang in one Berlin district, she says she feels safe in the multi-cultural, left-leaning district of Kreuzberg. "I wouldn't want to live in an area, where only native Germans live. Maybe I would like it, but I prefer to live in a cultural mixed district. Things have changed a lot in the last 13 years. When I left for Berlin, people would ask, 'what do you want there?' They didn't know Berlin. But today many find Berlin very cool and they come on visits. The image of Berlin has changed a lot for Israelis in the last ten years. What used to be the loathed capital of the Third Reich is now considered a great, open cosmopolitan city. Many Israelis flee from what's happening in the country and Berlin is a good destination'.  REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Israeli Jewish web designer Nili Shani works next to her cat Mitze at her office in Berlin November 5, 2013. "I came with my ex-girlfriend to Germany. I had many prejudices at the time. When you grow up in Israel you don't think great about Germany....more

Israeli Jewish web designer Nili Shani works next to her cat Mitze at her office in Berlin November 5, 2013. "I came with my ex-girlfriend to Germany. I had many prejudices at the time. When you grow up in Israel you don't think great about Germany. I do now, but at the time there was fear and prejudice, she said. Apart from once, when she felt threatened by members of a motorcycle gang in one Berlin district, she says she feels safe in the multi-cultural, left-leaning district of Kreuzberg. "I wouldn't want to live in an area, where only native Germans live. Maybe I would like it, but I prefer to live in a cultural mixed district. Things have changed a lot in the last 13 years. When I left for Berlin, people would ask, 'what do you want there?' They didn't know Berlin. But today many find Berlin very cool and they come on visits. The image of Berlin has changed a lot for Israelis in the last ten years. What used to be the loathed capital of the Third Reich is now considered a great, open cosmopolitan city. Many Israelis flee from what's happening in the country and Berlin is a good destination'. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Israeli Jewish shop assistant Uri poses for a picture in a kosher food shop in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin November 6, 2013. Uri came to Germany nearly 30 years ago, following a job offer that triggered his curiosity in the culture and language of his adopted country. "Jewish life in Germany has developed a lot culturally and it is better accepted. Ten years ago it was still somewhat dangerous. Today we feel safe in the city centre, but outside of the city we have to be careful. Slowly, we hope, Jewish life will flourish as well as it did in the past, with more Jewish shops, restaurants and cafes", Uri said. "Germans are different than in the past, more friendly, looking for contact and they are curious. I like working and living together with Germans". REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Israeli Jewish shop assistant Uri poses for a picture in a kosher food shop in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin November 6, 2013. Uri came to Germany nearly 30 years ago, following a job offer that triggered his curiosity in the culture and...more

Israeli Jewish shop assistant Uri poses for a picture in a kosher food shop in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin November 6, 2013. Uri came to Germany nearly 30 years ago, following a job offer that triggered his curiosity in the culture and language of his adopted country. "Jewish life in Germany has developed a lot culturally and it is better accepted. Ten years ago it was still somewhat dangerous. Today we feel safe in the city centre, but outside of the city we have to be careful. Slowly, we hope, Jewish life will flourish as well as it did in the past, with more Jewish shops, restaurants and cafes", Uri said. "Germans are different than in the past, more friendly, looking for contact and they are curious. I like working and living together with Germans". REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Israeli potter Anat Moses centers clay on the wheel in her workshop in Berlin, November 5, 2013. "At the time, when I came to Berlin, people in Israel didn't accept [my decision]. Today people say: 'What! you are not in Berlin?' "Everyone wants to come to Berlin. I feel at home here. There are many stories of love and hate, just like in Israel", Moses said. Moses' grandfather fled in 1938 from Nazi Germany to Palestine. She has incorporated her family history in an installation of ceramics, adoring vases with her grandfather's flora illustrations and Hebrew translations of German lullabies, that he used to sing. "People's reactions are interesting. I think they fear the Hebrew letters, maybe because they don't understand them. But I find the dialogue with the people exciting". REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Israeli potter Anat Moses centers clay on the wheel in her workshop in Berlin, November 5, 2013. "At the time, when I came to Berlin, people in Israel didn't accept [my decision]. Today people say: 'What! you are not in Berlin?' "Everyone wants to...more

Israeli potter Anat Moses centers clay on the wheel in her workshop in Berlin, November 5, 2013. "At the time, when I came to Berlin, people in Israel didn't accept [my decision]. Today people say: 'What! you are not in Berlin?' "Everyone wants to come to Berlin. I feel at home here. There are many stories of love and hate, just like in Israel", Moses said. Moses' grandfather fled in 1938 from Nazi Germany to Palestine. She has incorporated her family history in an installation of ceramics, adoring vases with her grandfather's flora illustrations and Hebrew translations of German lullabies, that he used to sing. "People's reactions are interesting. I think they fear the Hebrew letters, maybe because they don't understand them. But I find the dialogue with the people exciting". REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Israeli fashion designer Sharon Shalev-Schulz poses for a picture in her workshop in Berlin, November 6, 2013. "The first time I came to Berlin I fell in love with the city. And the second time I came to Berlin I fell in love with my husband. And the rest is history. I feel at home in Berlin. Home is where you make it. My grandparents suffered a lot during the holocaust. My grandmother gave me her blessing when she met my [German] husband. She liked him. If she hadn't, maybe I would have looked at it differently. I have some issues with older people here, its a bit wired. When I see an old person, I don't know if he was part of that or not. I don't have the same respect from the beginning, I have suspicions from the beginning. But I don't judge the young generation, I don't judge them for what their parents or grandparents did. But when I do see racism, wherever I am, it is the same in Israel, I have zero tolerance for that," Shalev-Schulz said during an interview. REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Israeli fashion designer Sharon Shalev-Schulz poses for a picture in her workshop in Berlin, November 6, 2013. "The first time I came to Berlin I fell in love with the city. And the second time I came to Berlin I fell in love with my husband. And the...more

Israeli fashion designer Sharon Shalev-Schulz poses for a picture in her workshop in Berlin, November 6, 2013. "The first time I came to Berlin I fell in love with the city. And the second time I came to Berlin I fell in love with my husband. And the rest is history. I feel at home in Berlin. Home is where you make it. My grandparents suffered a lot during the holocaust. My grandmother gave me her blessing when she met my [German] husband. She liked him. If she hadn't, maybe I would have looked at it differently. I have some issues with older people here, its a bit wired. When I see an old person, I don't know if he was part of that or not. I don't have the same respect from the beginning, I have suspicions from the beginning. But I don't judge the young generation, I don't judge them for what their parents or grandparents did. But when I do see racism, wherever I am, it is the same in Israel, I have zero tolerance for that," Shalev-Schulz said during an interview. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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<p>Inka Avigali Zach (L) and her husband Meli Zach of Israel pose for pictures in their restaurant 'Milo' in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin, November 6, 2013. The Zachs, came to Berlin from Hamburg to open the Milo restaurant that serves Israeli European food. "His family comes from here, they left Berlin in 1932. His granddad emigrated to Israel because he felt life was becoming increasingly difficult in Germany. He was going to open a German ice cream parlour in Israel, but died soon after [his arrival] in a bomb attack. So we are the one ones who bring the family back to Berlin. The restaurant takes its name from my grandfather," Avigali Zach said.  REUTERS/Thomas Peter</p>

Inka Avigali Zach (L) and her husband Meli Zach of Israel pose for pictures in their restaurant 'Milo' in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin, November 6, 2013. The Zachs, came to Berlin from Hamburg to open the Milo restaurant that serves Israeli...more

Inka Avigali Zach (L) and her husband Meli Zach of Israel pose for pictures in their restaurant 'Milo' in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin, November 6, 2013. The Zachs, came to Berlin from Hamburg to open the Milo restaurant that serves Israeli European food. "His family comes from here, they left Berlin in 1932. His granddad emigrated to Israel because he felt life was becoming increasingly difficult in Germany. He was going to open a German ice cream parlour in Israel, but died soon after [his arrival] in a bomb attack. So we are the one ones who bring the family back to Berlin. The restaurant takes its name from my grandfather," Avigali Zach said. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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