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Legacy of the IRA

<p>An Irish flag flies beside a mural in the Ardoyne area of North Belfast displaying an image of a I.R.A. gunman November 5, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

An Irish flag flies beside a mural in the Ardoyne area of North Belfast displaying an image of a I.R.A. gunman November 5, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

An Irish flag flies beside a mural in the Ardoyne area of North Belfast displaying an image of a I.R.A. gunman November 5, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

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<p>Members of a Republican band take part in a parade commemorating dead IRA members in the village of Castlederg, in County Tyrone August 11, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

Members of a Republican band take part in a parade commemorating dead IRA members in the village of Castlederg, in County Tyrone August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Members of a Republican band take part in a parade commemorating dead IRA members in the village of Castlederg, in County Tyrone August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

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<p>A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, claimed responsibility for the murders of two soldiers at an Army Barracks in Antrim.  REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, claimed responsibility for the murders of...more

A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, claimed responsibility for the murders of two soldiers at an Army Barracks in Antrim. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

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<p>A member of the Real IRA (3rd L) is applauded as he makes his way through the crowd to read a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009.   REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A member of the Real IRA (3rd L) is applauded as he makes his way through the crowd to read a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A member of the Real IRA (3rd L) is applauded as he makes his way through the crowd to read a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

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<p>A man walks past Irish Republican graffiti in west Belfast, December 7, 2004.  REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

A man walks past Irish Republican graffiti in west Belfast, December 7, 2004. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

A man walks past Irish Republican graffiti in west Belfast, December 7, 2004. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>Police remove the human remains found near Templetown Beach, County Louth, Republic of Ireland August 27, 2003. Police found the remains close to the spot where the IRA claim they buried the body of Jean McConville, a widowed mother of 10 children, who was shot after she went to the aid of a fatally wounded British soldier found outside her home more than 30 years ago. REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

Police remove the human remains found near Templetown Beach, County Louth, Republic of Ireland August 27, 2003. Police found the remains close to the spot where the IRA claim they buried the body of Jean McConville, a widowed mother of 10 children,...more

Police remove the human remains found near Templetown Beach, County Louth, Republic of Ireland August 27, 2003. Police found the remains close to the spot where the IRA claim they buried the body of Jean McConville, a widowed mother of 10 children, who was shot after she went to the aid of a fatally wounded British soldier found outside her home more than 30 years ago. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>British soldiers from the Royal Engineers Regiment dismantle the supersangar watchtower at Newtonhamilton in County Armagh, October 26, 2001. British forces began to take down a number of security sites in Northern Ireland following the IRA's decision to decommission some of their weapons. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell</p>

British soldiers from the Royal Engineers Regiment dismantle the supersangar watchtower at Newtonhamilton in County Armagh, October 26, 2001. British forces began to take down a number of security sites in Northern Ireland following the IRA's...more

British soldiers from the Royal Engineers Regiment dismantle the supersangar watchtower at Newtonhamilton in County Armagh, October 26, 2001. British forces began to take down a number of security sites in Northern Ireland following the IRA's decision to decommission some of their weapons. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell

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<p>Young girls from Holy Cross School watch British soldiers on patrol in the Ardoyne road in Belfast, October 24, 2001. The British government responded swiftly to the IRA's decision to disarm, saying it would tear down four key security installations in Northern Ireland as soon as possible. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell</p>

Young girls from Holy Cross School watch British soldiers on patrol in the Ardoyne road in Belfast, October 24, 2001. The British government responded swiftly to the IRA's decision to disarm, saying it would tear down four key security installations...more

Young girls from Holy Cross School watch British soldiers on patrol in the Ardoyne road in Belfast, October 24, 2001. The British government responded swiftly to the IRA's decision to disarm, saying it would tear down four key security installations in Northern Ireland as soon as possible. REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell

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<p>A anti-Republican (R) scuffles with marchers during a rally in Glasgow on May 27, 2001 to mark the 20th anniversary of a hunger strike by Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners at Northern Ireland's Maze prison.</p>

A anti-Republican (R) scuffles with marchers during a rally in Glasgow on May 27, 2001 to mark the 20th anniversary of a hunger strike by Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners at Northern Ireland's Maze prison.

A anti-Republican (R) scuffles with marchers during a rally in Glasgow on May 27, 2001 to mark the 20th anniversary of a hunger strike by Irish Republican Army (IRA) prisoners at Northern Ireland's Maze prison.

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<p>Carmel Lynagh holds a photograph of her dead son Jim after a press conference on the Falls Road, West Belfast, May 4, 2001. Jim Lynagh was killed along with 9 other Irish Republican Army (IRA) men and two civilians, by British security services in disputed circumstances. The European Court of Human Rights ruled May 4, 2001 that the 10 IRA guerrillas and two civilians had their human rights violated when they were killed by excessive use of force in four separate incidents in the 1980's and early 1990's.  REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

Carmel Lynagh holds a photograph of her dead son Jim after a press conference on the Falls Road, West Belfast, May 4, 2001. Jim Lynagh was killed along with 9 other Irish Republican Army (IRA) men and two civilians, by British security services in...more

Carmel Lynagh holds a photograph of her dead son Jim after a press conference on the Falls Road, West Belfast, May 4, 2001. Jim Lynagh was killed along with 9 other Irish Republican Army (IRA) men and two civilians, by British security services in disputed circumstances. The European Court of Human Rights ruled May 4, 2001 that the 10 IRA guerrillas and two civilians had their human rights violated when they were killed by excessive use of force in four separate incidents in the 1980's and early 1990's. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>Masked members of the Real IRA stand to attention as the coffin of leading dissident Republican Joseph O'Connor, is carried from his home in west Belfast, October 18, 2000. O'Connor was killed in an ambush on his car while he was visiting his mothers house in Belfast.  REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

Masked members of the Real IRA stand to attention as the coffin of leading dissident Republican Joseph O'Connor, is carried from his home in west Belfast, October 18, 2000. O'Connor was killed in an ambush on his car while he was visiting his mothers...more

Masked members of the Real IRA stand to attention as the coffin of leading dissident Republican Joseph O'Connor, is carried from his home in west Belfast, October 18, 2000. O'Connor was killed in an ambush on his car while he was visiting his mothers house in Belfast. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>An Irish police officer watches as a digger's bucket replaces sand back into Templetown Beach as an attempt to find the remains of Jean McConville near Dundalk came to an end May 20, 2000.  REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

An Irish police officer watches as a digger's bucket replaces sand back into Templetown Beach as an attempt to find the remains of Jean McConville near Dundalk came to an end May 20, 2000. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

An Irish police officer watches as a digger's bucket replaces sand back into Templetown Beach as an attempt to find the remains of Jean McConville near Dundalk came to an end May 20, 2000. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams leaves his party headquarters in Dublin May 9, 2000. Sinn Fein met in Dublin to discuss the recent developments in Northern Ireland following last weekend's announcement of the IRA's intention to 'put their arms beyond use'.  REUTERS/Ferran Paredes</p>

Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams leaves his party headquarters in Dublin May 9, 2000. Sinn Fein met in Dublin to discuss the recent developments in Northern Ireland following last weekend's announcement of the IRA's intention to 'put their arms beyond...more

Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams leaves his party headquarters in Dublin May 9, 2000. Sinn Fein met in Dublin to discuss the recent developments in Northern Ireland following last weekend's announcement of the IRA's intention to 'put their arms beyond use'. REUTERS/Ferran Paredes

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<p>File photo shows Belfast policeman examining one of hundreds of weapons captured by the security forces from the IRA over the last twenty years.   REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

File photo shows Belfast policeman examining one of hundreds of weapons captured by the security forces from the IRA over the last twenty years. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

File photo shows Belfast policeman examining one of hundreds of weapons captured by the security forces from the IRA over the last twenty years. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>An adult and a child walk under Irish Republican Army (IRA) graffitti on a bridge in Twinbrooke, west Belfast, February 4, 2000.   REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

An adult and a child walk under Irish Republican Army (IRA) graffitti on a bridge in Twinbrooke, west Belfast, February 4, 2000. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

An adult and a child walk under Irish Republican Army (IRA) graffitti on a bridge in Twinbrooke, west Belfast, February 4, 2000. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>Relatives of the 14 unarmed Catholic protesters shot dead by the British Army carry crosses and flags on the Bloody Sunday anniversary march in Londonderry January 30, 2000.  REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

Relatives of the 14 unarmed Catholic protesters shot dead by the British Army carry crosses and flags on the Bloody Sunday anniversary march in Londonderry January 30, 2000. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

Relatives of the 14 unarmed Catholic protesters shot dead by the British Army carry crosses and flags on the Bloody Sunday anniversary march in Londonderry January 30, 2000. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>A man walks his dog past a newspaper billboard in west Belfast November 16, 1999. The Ulster Unionists led by David Trimble, said if the IRA appointed a go-between to hold discussions with the province's disarmament commission a coalition government could be formed.  REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

A man walks his dog past a newspaper billboard in west Belfast November 16, 1999. The Ulster Unionists led by David Trimble, said if the IRA appointed a go-between to hold discussions with the province's disarmament commission a coalition government...more

A man walks his dog past a newspaper billboard in west Belfast November 16, 1999. The Ulster Unionists led by David Trimble, said if the IRA appointed a go-between to hold discussions with the province's disarmament commission a coalition government could be formed. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>A woman walks in front of a wall showing graffiti in support of Irish Republicans in a west Belfast housing estate, January 11, 1999. The graffiti, which is an angry response from the IRA to demands to start decommissioning their weapons, comes after the British Prime Minister Tony Blair wrote in two leading Belfast newspapers that a start to decommissioning would do more to create confidence between the two communities in Northern Ireland than any other single step.  REUTERS/Paul McErlane</p>

A woman walks in front of a wall showing graffiti in support of Irish Republicans in a west Belfast housing estate, January 11, 1999. The graffiti, which is an angry response from the IRA to demands to start decommissioning their weapons, comes after...more

A woman walks in front of a wall showing graffiti in support of Irish Republicans in a west Belfast housing estate, January 11, 1999. The graffiti, which is an angry response from the IRA to demands to start decommissioning their weapons, comes after the British Prime Minister Tony Blair wrote in two leading Belfast newspapers that a start to decommissioning would do more to create confidence between the two communities in Northern Ireland than any other single step. REUTERS/Paul McErlane

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<p>Undated file photo shows a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) posing with an AK-47 assault rifle for a Republican Resistance Calendar somewhere in Ireland.  REUTERS/Handout</p>

Undated file photo shows a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) posing with an AK-47 assault rifle for a Republican Resistance Calendar somewhere in Ireland. REUTERS/Handout

Undated file photo shows a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) posing with an AK-47 assault rifle for a Republican Resistance Calendar somewhere in Ireland. REUTERS/Handout

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<p>File photo of Police standing in the rubble after a car-bomb ripped through the market town of Omagh in Northern Ireland killing over twenty people on August 15, 1998. The IRA guerrilla group, under pressure to finally renounce violence, apologized for the civilian deaths and injuries it caused during its 30 year campaign against British control of Northern Ireland. REUTERS/MikeMahoney</p>

File photo of Police standing in the rubble after a car-bomb ripped through the market town of Omagh in Northern Ireland killing over twenty people on August 15, 1998. The IRA guerrilla group, under pressure to finally renounce violence, apologized...more

File photo of Police standing in the rubble after a car-bomb ripped through the market town of Omagh in Northern Ireland killing over twenty people on August 15, 1998. The IRA guerrilla group, under pressure to finally renounce violence, apologized for the civilian deaths and injuries it caused during its 30 year campaign against British control of Northern Ireland. REUTERS/MikeMahoney

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<p>Mourners at the funerals for the three IRA guerrillas killed in Gibraltar take cover behind a gravestone when an unidentified gunman shoots at the crowd.  At least three people had died and many more injured in the attack on March 16, 1988.  REUTERS/Denis Paquin</p>

Mourners at the funerals for the three IRA guerrillas killed in Gibraltar take cover behind a gravestone when an unidentified gunman shoots at the crowd. At least three people had died and many more injured in the attack on March 16, 1988. ...more

Mourners at the funerals for the three IRA guerrillas killed in Gibraltar take cover behind a gravestone when an unidentified gunman shoots at the crowd. At least three people had died and many more injured in the attack on March 16, 1988. REUTERS/Denis Paquin

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<p>Police usher spectators off the grounds of the Aintree racecourse after receiving a bomb warning before the start of the Grand National horse race April 5, 1997. The alert forced authorities to abandon the race, one of Britain's biggest sporting events. Prime Minister John Major blamed the alert on the Irish Republican Army (IRA).  REUTERS/Paul Hackett</p>

Police usher spectators off the grounds of the Aintree racecourse after receiving a bomb warning before the start of the Grand National horse race April 5, 1997. The alert forced authorities to abandon the race, one of Britain's biggest sporting...more

Police usher spectators off the grounds of the Aintree racecourse after receiving a bomb warning before the start of the Grand National horse race April 5, 1997. The alert forced authorities to abandon the race, one of Britain's biggest sporting events. Prime Minister John Major blamed the alert on the Irish Republican Army (IRA). REUTERS/Paul Hackett

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<p>Soldiers and police mount searches following the murder of postal worker Frank Kerr in an attack by suspected IRA (Irish Reprublican Army) gunmen in Newry November 10, 1994.  REUTERS/Crispin Rodwell</p>

Soldiers and police mount searches following the murder of postal worker Frank Kerr in an attack by suspected IRA (Irish Reprublican Army) gunmen in Newry November 10, 1994. REUTERS/Crispin Rodwell

Soldiers and police mount searches following the murder of postal worker Frank Kerr in an attack by suspected IRA (Irish Reprublican Army) gunmen in Newry November 10, 1994. REUTERS/Crispin Rodwell

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<p>The bomb damaged area of the City of London is seen in this April 24, 1993 file photo after two blasts ripped through a few of the the buildings in the area. Dozens of people were injured in the blast.  REUTERS/Andre Camara</p>

The bomb damaged area of the City of London is seen in this April 24, 1993 file photo after two blasts ripped through a few of the the buildings in the area. Dozens of people were injured in the blast. REUTERS/Andre Camara

The bomb damaged area of the City of London is seen in this April 24, 1993 file photo after two blasts ripped through a few of the the buildings in the area. Dozens of people were injured in the blast. REUTERS/Andre Camara

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