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Pictures | Tue Apr 24, 2012 | 12:00pm EDT

Living near Chernobyl

<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, has breakfast in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. Shamianok never left his village in spite of the Chernobyl blast, and he is now one of six last villagers that still live in Tulgovichi. Belarus, Ukraine and Russia will be marking the 26th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor explosion, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, which took place on April 26, 1986. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko  </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, has breakfast in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. Shamianok never left his village...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, has breakfast in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. Shamianok never left his village in spite of the Chernobyl blast, and he is now one of six last villagers that still live in Tulgovichi. Belarus, Ukraine and Russia will be marking the 26th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor explosion, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, which took place on April 26, 1986. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, drinks vodka during his breakfast in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, drinks vodka during his breakfast in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012....more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, drinks vodka during his breakfast in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, walks at a cemetery on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012.  REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko</p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, walks at a cemetery on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, walks at a cemetery on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, washes his face at a house in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012.  REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko  </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, washes his face at a house in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, washes his face at a house in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, prepares food for his cattle in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012.  REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko  </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, prepares food for his cattle in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, prepares food for his cattle in his house at the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, feeds his pigs at his house in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012.   REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, feeds his pigs at his house in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, feeds his pigs at his house in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, walks at a cemetery on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012.   REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, walks at a cemetery on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 87, walks at a cemetery on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok (L), 87, meets with former neighbours on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, at a cemetery in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko  </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok (L), 87, meets with former neighbours on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, at a cemetery in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok (L), 87, meets with former neighbours on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, at a cemetery in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok (L), 87, talks with former neighbours on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, at a cemetery in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko  </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok (L), 87, talks with former neighbours on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, at a cemetery in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok (L), 87, talks with former neighbours on the eve of "Radunitsa", or the Day of Rejoicing, a holiday in the Eastern Orthodox Church to remember the dead, at a cemetery in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 23, 2012. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Ivan Shamianok, 86, walks with his cow in the village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, February 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko </p>

Ivan Shamianok, 86, walks with his cow in the village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, February 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

Ivan Shamianok, 86, walks with his cow in the village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, February 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Ivan Shamianok, 86, sits at his house in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko </p>

Ivan Shamianok, 86, sits at his house in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko more

Ivan Shamianok, 86, sits at his house in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok stands in his house in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, February 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok stands in his house in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, February 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok stands in his house in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (230 miles) southeast of Minsk, February 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok, 80, drinks milk from his cow in a village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (18 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (217 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 8, 2006. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko</p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 80, drinks milk from his cow in a village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (18 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (217 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 8, 2006. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko more

Villager Ivan Shamianok, 80, drinks milk from his cow in a village of Tulgovichi, near the 30 km (18 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km (217 miles) southeast of Minsk, April 8, 2006. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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<p>Villager Ivan Shamianok rests at his house, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, some 370 km (217 miles) southeast of Minsk, March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko </p>

Villager Ivan Shamianok rests at his house, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, some 370 km (217 miles) southeast of Minsk, March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily...more

Villager Ivan Shamianok rests at his house, near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the almost abandoned village of Tulgovichi, some 370 km (217 miles) southeast of Minsk, March 17, 2011. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

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