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Pictures | Fri Apr 26, 2013 | 2:26pm EDT

Living without sight

<p>Dale Layne, a student who says he is totally blind, feels his way down a hallway while heading to the gym at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 3, 2013. Due to his blindness, Layne says he sometimes suffers from Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder, which makes him indifferent to a day-night light cycle. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Dale Layne, a student who says he is totally blind, feels his way down a hallway while heading to the gym at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 3, 2013. Due to his blindness, Layne says he sometimes suffers from...more

Dale Layne, a student who says he is totally blind, feels his way down a hallway while heading to the gym at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 3, 2013. Due to his blindness, Layne says he sometimes suffers from Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder, which makes him indifferent to a day-night light cycle. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Visually impaired student Toni Millican is guided towards an iPad screen during a class of the Older Blind Program at World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. Janet Ford, an instructor who is part of the Older Blind Program, which enrols blind or visually impaired students older than 54 years old, says touch screen computers are easier to use than a traditional keyboard for her students.
REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Visually impaired student Toni Millican is guided towards an iPad screen during a class of the Older Blind Program at World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. Janet Ford, an instructor who is part of the Older Blind...more

Visually impaired student Toni Millican is guided towards an iPad screen during a class of the Older Blind Program at World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. Janet Ford, an instructor who is part of the Older Blind Program, which enrols blind or visually impaired students older than 54 years old, says touch screen computers are easier to use than a traditional keyboard for her students. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Students enrolled in the Older Blind Program at the World Services for the Blind  learn how to use an iPad in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. The WSB is a rehabilitation center for the blind or visually impaired which offers life skills and career training programs designed to help those enrolled achieve sustainable independence. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Students enrolled in the Older Blind Program at the World Services for the Blind learn how to use an iPad in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. The WSB is a rehabilitation center for the blind or visually impaired which offers life skills and...more

Students enrolled in the Older Blind Program at the World Services for the Blind learn how to use an iPad in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. The WSB is a rehabilitation center for the blind or visually impaired which offers life skills and career training programs designed to help those enrolled achieve sustainable independence. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Jackie Thompson, a visually impaired student, touches the screen of an iPad during the Older Blind Program class at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. 

 REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Jackie Thompson, a visually impaired student, touches the screen of an iPad during the Older Blind Program class at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Jackie Thompson, a visually impaired student, touches the screen of an iPad during the Older Blind Program class at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Students taking part in the Older Blind Program listen to a lesson on how to use an iPad at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013.  REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Students taking part in the Older Blind Program listen to a lesson on how to use an iPad at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Students taking part in the Older Blind Program listen to a lesson on how to use an iPad at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Students from the World Services for the Blind sit to watch a movie inside a theater in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. Robert Brown (L), visually impaired because of Stargardt disease, Dale Layne (C), blind with light perception because of glaucoma, and Cynda Bellamy, a sighted recreation specialist at the WSB, were preparing to watch "Cloud Atlas."  REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Students from the World Services for the Blind sit to watch a movie inside a theater in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. Robert Brown (L), visually impaired because of Stargardt disease, Dale Layne (C), blind with light perception because of...more

Students from the World Services for the Blind sit to watch a movie inside a theater in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. Robert Brown (L), visually impaired because of Stargardt disease, Dale Layne (C), blind with light perception because of glaucoma, and Cynda Bellamy, a sighted recreation specialist at the WSB, were preparing to watch "Cloud Atlas." REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Visually impaired student Curtis Norton sits in a van operated by the World Services for the Blind during a shopping trip in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. 

REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Visually impaired student Curtis Norton sits in a van operated by the World Services for the Blind during a shopping trip in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Visually impaired student Curtis Norton sits in a van operated by the World Services for the Blind during a shopping trip in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>David Givens (R), a visually impaired albino student from the World Services for the Blind, pulls a package of socks close to his eyes while shopping at a department store in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. 

REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

David Givens (R), a visually impaired albino student from the World Services for the Blind, pulls a package of socks close to his eyes while shopping at a department store in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

David Givens (R), a visually impaired albino student from the World Services for the Blind, pulls a package of socks close to his eyes while shopping at a department store in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Robert Brown (L), a student at the World Services for the Blind who is visually impaired due to Stargardt disease, gets close to a movie poster to read its words outside a theater in Little Rock, Arkansas January 4, 2013. Brown can read from a very short distance or using a magnifying lens. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Robert Brown (L), a student at the World Services for the Blind who is visually impaired due to Stargardt disease, gets close to a movie poster to read its words outside a theater in Little Rock, Arkansas January 4, 2013. Brown can read from a very...more

Robert Brown (L), a student at the World Services for the Blind who is visually impaired due to Stargardt disease, gets close to a movie poster to read its words outside a theater in Little Rock, Arkansas January 4, 2013. Brown can read from a very short distance or using a magnifying lens. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Visually impaired student Curtis Norton, assisted by his guide dog, knocks on an entrance door to the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. 


REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Visually impaired student Curtis Norton, assisted by his guide dog, knocks on an entrance door to the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Visually impaired student Curtis Norton, assisted by his guide dog, knocks on an entrance door to the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Blind and visually impaired students are photographed during lunchtime in the cafeteria of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. 
REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Blind and visually impaired students are photographed during lunchtime in the cafeteria of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Blind and visually impaired students are photographed during lunchtime in the cafeteria of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>A group of blind and visually impaired students from the World Services for the Blind push shopping carts while entering a department store with a guide dog in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

A group of blind and visually impaired students from the World Services for the Blind push shopping carts while entering a department store with a guide dog in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

A group of blind and visually impaired students from the World Services for the Blind push shopping carts while entering a department store with a guide dog in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign listen to instructions on how to guide a blind person during a simulation exercise at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013.  REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign listen to instructions on how to guide a blind person during a simulation exercise at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci more

Students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign listen to instructions on how to guide a blind person during a simulation exercise at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign learn how to guide a blind person during a simulation exercise at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013.  REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign learn how to guide a blind person during a simulation exercise at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign learn how to guide a blind person during a simulation exercise at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Visually impaired student Michael Fleming stares into his laptop while playing music in the auditorium of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 3, 2013. Fleming, who has high myopia, enjoys mixing hip-hop and R&amp;B music with software that requires the use of vision. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Visually impaired student Michael Fleming stares into his laptop while playing music in the auditorium of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 3, 2013. Fleming, who has high myopia, enjoys mixing hip-hop and R&B...more

Visually impaired student Michael Fleming stares into his laptop while playing music in the auditorium of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 3, 2013. Fleming, who has high myopia, enjoys mixing hip-hop and R&B music with software that requires the use of vision. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Aran Abramovich, who is totally blind, studies using a computer at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. Abramovich listens to his lessons on the computer using Jaws, a software developed for the blind and visually impaired, which converts text into audio. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Aran Abramovich, who is totally blind, studies using a computer at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. Abramovich listens to his lessons on the computer using Jaws, a software developed for the blind and...more

Aran Abramovich, who is totally blind, studies using a computer at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. Abramovich listens to his lessons on the computer using Jaws, a software developed for the blind and visually impaired, which converts text into audio. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Visually impaired student LaDavid Mahaffey grabs his clothes after doing laundry at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013.
 REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Visually impaired student LaDavid Mahaffey grabs his clothes after doing laundry at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Visually impaired student LaDavid Mahaffey grabs his clothes after doing laundry at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Visually impaired student Jeff Giffen holds his tray after having lunch in the cafeteria of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. 

 REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Visually impaired student Jeff Giffen holds his tray after having lunch in the cafeteria of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Visually impaired student Jeff Giffen holds his tray after having lunch in the cafeteria of the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Dale Layne, a student who says he is blind with light perception, lies in his bed while posing for a portrait at the World Services for the Blind (WSB) in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. 


REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Dale Layne, a student who says he is blind with light perception, lies in his bed while posing for a portrait at the World Services for the Blind (WSB) in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Dale Layne, a student who says he is blind with light perception, lies in his bed while posing for a portrait at the World Services for the Blind (WSB) in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Braillenote, a computer with a refreshable Braille display for the blind or visually impaired users, hangs from the shoulder of a student at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. 
REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Braillenote, a computer with a refreshable Braille display for the blind or visually impaired users, hangs from the shoulder of a student at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Braillenote, a computer with a refreshable Braille display for the blind or visually impaired users, hangs from the shoulder of a student at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>The shadow of a plant falls upon the pages of the Book of Genesis, written in Braille, as it sits in a hallway at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 8, 2013. 

 REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

The shadow of a plant falls upon the pages of the Book of Genesis, written in Braille, as it sits in a hallway at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 8, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

The shadow of a plant falls upon the pages of the Book of Genesis, written in Braille, as it sits in a hallway at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 8, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>A flash card, used to teach Braille, is caught in a window pane at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013.
 REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

A flash card, used to teach Braille, is caught in a window pane at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

A flash card, used to teach Braille, is caught in a window pane at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Renna, a guide dog, rests with visually impaired student Curtis Norton during a trip in a van operated by the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Renna, a guide dog, rests with visually impaired student Curtis Norton during a trip in a van operated by the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

Renna, a guide dog, rests with visually impaired student Curtis Norton during a trip in a van operated by the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas January 5, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>A sign, with Braille, is seen at the entrance to a classroom at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. 

REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

A sign, with Braille, is seen at the entrance to a classroom at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

A sign, with Braille, is seen at the entrance to a classroom at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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<p>Albino and visually impaired student David Givens sits in a hallway at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. Albinism is a group of genetic conditions that causes a lack of melanin pigment in the eyes or both in the eyes and in the skin.

 REUTERS/Gaia Squarci</p>

Albino and visually impaired student David Givens sits in a hallway at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. Albinism is a group of genetic conditions that causes a lack of melanin pigment in the eyes or both in...more

Albino and visually impaired student David Givens sits in a hallway at the World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 6, 2013. Albinism is a group of genetic conditions that causes a lack of melanin pigment in the eyes or both in the eyes and in the skin. REUTERS/Gaia Squarci

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