" /> " />
Edition:
United States

Memorable Olympic quotes

"Good evening, Mr Bond." The 86-year-old Queen Elizabeth makes her film debut in a clip with James Bond star Daniel Craig shown as part of the quirky opening ceremony. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

"Good evening, Mr Bond." The 86-year-old Queen Elizabeth makes her film debut in a clip with James Bond star Daniel Craig shown as part of the quirky opening ceremony. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Close
1 / 15

"I've been trying and working for an Olympic medal for four years and now I lost it in one second. It's just impossible to accept." South Korean fencer Shin A-lam held a sit-down protest after losing her epee semi-final bout where a one-second clock reset allowed her opponent to score a winning hit. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

"I've been trying and working for an Olympic medal for four years and now I lost it in one second. It's just impossible to accept." South Korean fencer Shin A-lam held a sit-down protest after losing her epee semi-final bout where a one-second clock reset allowed her opponent to score a winning hit. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Close
2 / 15

"The female body is a masterpiece. Everyone likes to look at the female body, especially in dynamic, athletic sport." Natalie Cook, gold medallist at Sydney in 2000, defends bikinis in beach volleyball. REUTERS/Marcelo Del Pozo

"The female body is a masterpiece. Everyone likes to look at the female body, especially in dynamic, athletic sport." Natalie Cook, gold medallist at Sydney in 2000, defends bikinis in beach volleyball. REUTERS/Marcelo Del Pozo

Close
3 / 15

"There are many people who want to start rowing because I have come to the Olympic Games. We will start when I get back. We just have to wait for the boats to arrive." Wildcard Niger rower Hamadou Djibo Issaka trained for just three months for the men's single sculls, but never in his landlocked and mostly desert country. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside

"There are many people who want to start rowing because I have come to the Olympic Games. We will start when I get back. We just have to wait for the boats to arrive." Wildcard Niger rower Hamadou Djibo Issaka trained for just three months for the men's single sculls, but never in his landlocked and mostly desert country. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside

Close
4 / 15

"Some of you will be baffled, I can guarantee it ... I hope you enjoy that kind of Liquorice Allsorts of things. Many of you won't understand that reference, either." Director Danny Boyle prepares international journalists for the opening ceremony he devised. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

"Some of you will be baffled, I can guarantee it ... I hope you enjoy that kind of Liquorice Allsorts of things. Many of you won't understand that reference, either." Director Danny Boyle prepares international journalists for the opening ceremony he devised. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

Close
5 / 15

"Having been soundly beaten by Ariel since she was nine, I can certainly attest to her talent." Billionaire and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is humbled by Ariel Hsing, the now 16-year-old U.S. women's table tennis player who calls him "Uncle Bill". REUTERS/Grigory Dukor

"Having been soundly beaten by Ariel since she was nine, I can certainly attest to her talent." Billionaire and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is humbled by Ariel Hsing, the now 16-year-old U.S. women's table tennis player who calls him "Uncle Bill". REUTERS/Grigory Dukor

Close
6 / 15

"We went into the gym and none of us had never seen anything like it in our lives. There were Russian athletes stretching, doing things with their legs you thought were physically impossible." Stuart Pearce, coach of the British men's football team, on life in the Olympic Village. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh

"We went into the gym and none of us had never seen anything like it in our lives. There were Russian athletes stretching, doing things with their legs you thought were physically impossible." Stuart Pearce, coach of the British men's football team, on life in the Olympic Village. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh

Close
7 / 15

"I'm happy to say I'm the third in the world." British golden girl Rebecca Adlington, unexpected swimming double gold medal winner at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, expresses her delight at winning a bronze before a cheering home crowd in London. REUTERS/David Gray

"I'm happy to say I'm the third in the world." British golden girl Rebecca Adlington, unexpected swimming double gold medal winner at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, expresses her delight at winning a bronze before a cheering home crowd in London. REUTERS/David Gray

Close
8 / 15

"My results come from hard work and training and I would never use any banned drugs. The Chinese people have clean hands." Chinese swimming sensation Ye Shiwen brushes aside doping suspicions raised after the 16-year-old set a world record to win the women's 400-metre individual medley. REUTERS/David Gray

"My results come from hard work and training and I would never use any banned drugs. The Chinese people have clean hands." Chinese swimming sensation Ye Shiwen brushes aside doping suspicions raised after the 16-year-old set a world record to win the women's 400-metre individual medley. REUTERS/David Gray

Close
9 / 15

"The excitement is growing so much I think the Geiger counter of Olympo-mania is going to go 'zoink' off the scale." London Mayor Boris Johnson is characteristically effusive in summing up the mood at an Olympics concert in London's Hyde Park. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

"The excitement is growing so much I think the Geiger counter of Olympo-mania is going to go 'zoink' off the scale." London Mayor Boris Johnson is characteristically effusive in summing up the mood at an Olympics concert in London's Hyde Park. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Close
10 / 15

"It's tough. It's not ballet." Six foot 5 inch (1.96 metre) Croatian water polo player Miho Boskovic clutches a bag of ice to his elbow as he describes the sport following a tough comeback win over Greece. REUTERS/Laszlo Balogh

"It's tough. It's not ballet." Six foot 5 inch (1.96 metre) Croatian water polo player Miho Boskovic clutches a bag of ice to his elbow as he describes the sport following a tough comeback win over Greece. REUTERS/Laszlo Balogh

Close
11 / 15

"I said 'The medal is there, we have to take it'. I had a super feeling. I felt something big, but now I feel something even bigger, a big pain." Injured Swiss cyclist Fabian Cancellara rues a crash in the men's road race. REUTERS/Phil Noble

"I said 'The medal is there, we have to take it'. I had a super feeling. I felt something big, but now I feel something even bigger, a big pain." Injured Swiss cyclist Fabian Cancellara rues a crash in the men's road race. REUTERS/Phil Noble

Close
12 / 15

"She made it into the opening ceremony. She obviously should not have been there ... I can now confirm that she was a cast member. She was slightly over-excited." London 2012 organizing committee chairman Sebastian Coe is asked to explain how a woman breached security to gatecrash India's athletes' parade at the opening ceremony. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

"She made it into the opening ceremony. She obviously should not have been there ... I can now confirm that she was a cast member. She was slightly over-excited." London 2012 organizing committee chairman Sebastian Coe is asked to explain how a woman breached security to gatecrash India's athletes' parade at the opening ceremony. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

Close
13 / 15

"It's hard to know just how well it will turn out ... There are a few things that were disconcerting." Visiting U.S. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney sparks indignation after questioning London's readiness to host the Games, citing a threatened strike by immigration and customs officials. REUTERS/Jason Reed

"It's hard to know just how well it will turn out ... There are a few things that were disconcerting." Visiting U.S. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney sparks indignation after questioning London's readiness to host the Games, citing a threatened strike by immigration and customs officials. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Close
14 / 15

"Had I won the gold medal, I would have retired." Roger Bannister, famous for running a mile in under four minutes in 1954, reveals he might have quit two years earlier had he not missed out on the medals at the Helsinki Olympics. REUTERS/LOCOG/Pool

"Had I won the gold medal, I would have retired." Roger Bannister, famous for running a mile in under four minutes in 1954, reveals he might have quit two years earlier had he not missed out on the medals at the Helsinki Olympics. REUTERS/LOCOG/Pool

Close
15 / 15

All Collections

Quake strikes Indonesia

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

All Collections

Spotted at Trump Tower

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

All Collections

Inside the recount

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

All Collections

The human toll of Philippines' deadly drug war

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

All Collections

Remembering Pearl Harbor

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

All Collections

The attack on Pearl Harbor

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

All Collections

In memoriam: Those we lost in 2016

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

All Collections

Trump: Person of the year

Wednesday, December 07, 2016