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Mongolia's environmental neo-Nazis

<p>Chimedbaatar, a member of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, poses for a portrait at the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013.  Over the past years, ultra-nationalist groups have expanded in the country and among those garnering attention is Tsagaan Khass, which has recently shifted its focus from activities such as attacks on women it accuses of consorting with foreign men to environmental issues, with the stated goal of protecting Mongolia from foreign mining interests. This ultra-nationalist group was founded in the 1990s and currently has more than a hundred active members. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Chimedbaatar, a member of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, poses for a portrait at the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. Over the past years, ultra-nationalist groups have expanded in the country and among those garnering...more

Chimedbaatar, a member of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, poses for a portrait at the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. Over the past years, ultra-nationalist groups have expanded in the country and among those garnering attention is Tsagaan Khass, which has recently shifted its focus from activities such as attacks on women it accuses of consorting with foreign men to environmental issues, with the stated goal of protecting Mongolia from foreign mining interests. This ultra-nationalist group was founded in the 1990s and currently has more than a hundred active members. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Ariunbold Altankhuum, founder of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stands next to a statue of Chingunjav, a Mongolian national hero (unseen), in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. The group has rebranded itself as an environmentalist organisation fighting pollution by foreign-owned mines, seeking legitimacy as it sends Swastika-wearing members to check mining permits.  REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Ariunbold Altankhuum, founder of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stands next to a statue of Chingunjav, a Mongolian national hero (unseen), in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. The group has rebranded itself as an environmentalist organisation...more

Ariunbold Altankhuum, founder of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stands next to a statue of Chingunjav, a Mongolian national hero (unseen), in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. The group has rebranded itself as an environmentalist organisation fighting pollution by foreign-owned mines, seeking legitimacy as it sends Swastika-wearing members to check mining permits. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Uranjargal, a leader of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, poses for a portrait at the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Uranjargal, a leader of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, poses for a portrait at the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Uranjargal, a leader of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, poses for a portrait at the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Tattoos are seen on the back of a member of a self-described skinhead group as he trains at a gym in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013.   REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Tattoos are seen on the back of a member of a self-described skinhead group as he trains at a gym in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Tattoos are seen on the back of a member of a self-described skinhead group as he trains at a gym in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Ariunbold and Uranjargal (L), leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, leave the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Ariunbold and Uranjargal (L), leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, leave the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Ariunbold and Uranjargal (L), leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, leave the group's headquarters in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>A member of a self-described skinhead group clenches his fist as he trains at a gym in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

A member of a self-described skinhead group clenches his fist as he trains at a gym in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A member of a self-described skinhead group clenches his fist as he trains at a gym in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Ariunbold (L) and Uranjargal, leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stand next to a statue of Chingunjav, a Mongolian national hero, in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Ariunbold (L) and Uranjargal, leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stand next to a statue of Chingunjav, a Mongolian national hero, in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Ariunbold (L) and Uranjargal, leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stand next to a statue of Chingunjav, a Mongolian national hero, in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Ariunbold and Uranjargal (L), leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stand next to a construction site in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Ariunbold and Uranjargal (L), leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stand next to a construction site in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Ariunbold and Uranjargal (L), leaders of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stand next to a construction site in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>A swastika is seen on the seat of a car belonging to Ariunbold, leader of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, as he drives along a busy street in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

A swastika is seen on the seat of a car belonging to Ariunbold, leader of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, as he drives along a busy street in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A swastika is seen on the seat of a car belonging to Ariunbold, leader of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, as he drives along a busy street in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass leave their headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013.  REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass leave their headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass leave their headquarters in Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>A painting of Mongolian national hero Genghis Khan hangs in the headquarters of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

A painting of Mongolian national hero Genghis Khan hangs in the headquarters of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A painting of Mongolian national hero Genghis Khan hangs in the headquarters of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Ariunbold Altankhuum, founder of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass smokes as he sits at his desk at the group headquarters in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Ariunbold Altankhuum, founder of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass smokes as he sits at his desk at the group headquarters in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Ariunbold Altankhuum, founder of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass smokes as he sits at his desk at the group headquarters in Ulan Bator June 22, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass take a break as they travel to a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass take a break as they travel to a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass take a break as they travel to a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass stand near a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass stand near a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass stand near a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass talk to a worker at a quarry southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013.  REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass talk to a worker at a quarry southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass talk to a worker at a quarry southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Members of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, walk through a quarry during a so-called 'environmental patrol', 50km south west of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013.  REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Members of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, walk through a quarry during a so-called 'environmental patrol', 50km south west of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Members of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, walk through a quarry during a so-called 'environmental patrol', 50km south west of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>A Member of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stands in a quarry during a so-called 'environmental patrol', 50km south west of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013.   REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

A Member of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stands in a quarry during a so-called 'environmental patrol', 50km south west of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A Member of Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass, stands in a quarry during a so-called 'environmental patrol', 50km south west of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass walk through a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass walk through a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass walk through a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>A member of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass stands next to a 'ger', a traditional Mongolian tent, at a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013.   REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

A member of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass stands next to a 'ger', a traditional Mongolian tent, at a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A member of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass stands next to a 'ger', a traditional Mongolian tent, at a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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<p>Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass walk through a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass walk through a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass walk through a quarry, where they questioned a worker, southwest of Ulan Bator June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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