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New land, but also costs, as Nordic nations rise from sea

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Hans Lindberg, a 56-year-old Swede, shows a black and white family photo from the early 1960s of two girls playing in a sandpit that used to be at his parents' summer cottage near Lulea November 16, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Hans Lindberg, a 56-year-old Swede, shows a black and white family photo from the early 1960s of two girls playing in a sandpit that used to be at his parents' summer cottage near Lulea November 16, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Hans Lindberg, a 56-year-old Swede, points towards a low, muddy area of reeds that has risen from the Baltic Sea, forming a land bridge to what used to be an island nearby when he spent his summers here, close to the city of Lulea as a child in the early 1960s in this picture from November 16, 2012. In contrast to worries from the Maldives to Manhattan of storm surges and higher ocean levels caused by climate change, the entire...more

Hans Lindberg, a 56-year-old Swede, points towards a low, muddy area of reeds that has risen from the Baltic Sea, forming a land bridge to what used to be an island nearby when he spent his summers here, close to the city of Lulea as a child in the early 1960s in this picture from November 16, 2012. In contrast to worries from the Maldives to Manhattan of storm surges and higher ocean levels caused by climate change, the entire northern part of the Nordic region is rising and, as a result, the Baltic Sea is receding. In the Lulea region just south of the Arctic Circle, mostly flat with pine forests and where the sea freezes in winter, tracts of land have emerged, leaving some Stone Age, Viking and Medieval sites inland. That puts human settlements gradually out of harm's way from sea flooding. Picture taken November 16, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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A sheep grazes on land that used to be part of the seabed until the 15th century, near the old town of Lulea in northern Sweden November 15, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

A sheep grazes on land that used to be part of the seabed until the 15th century, near the old town of Lulea in northern Sweden November 15, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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A man walks along the streets in the old town of Lulea November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

A man walks along the streets in the old town of Lulea November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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Jeanette Lestander, construction manager at the Swedish Baltic Sea port of Lulea, stands on the dock November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Jeanette Lestander, construction manager at the Swedish Baltic Sea port of Lulea, stands on the dock November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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A view of the Swedish Baltic Sea port of Lulea November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

A view of the Swedish Baltic Sea port of Lulea November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
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