Edition:
United States
Pictures | Thu Feb 28, 2013 | 10:20am EST

Northern Ireland's murals

<p>A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts Operation Motorman, February 21, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements.   REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts Operation Motorman, February 21, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary...more

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts Operation Motorman, February 21, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
1 / 14
<p>A mural shows the apparition of the Virgin Mary to six Catholics in the town of Medjugorje in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Ardoyne area of North Belfast, February 20, 2013.   REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural shows the apparition of the Virgin Mary to six Catholics in the town of Medjugorje in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Ardoyne area of North Belfast, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural shows the apparition of the Virgin Mary to six Catholics in the town of Medjugorje in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Ardoyne area of North Belfast, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
2 / 14
<p>People walk past a Loyalist Paramilitary mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

People walk past a Loyalist Paramilitary mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

People walk past a Loyalist Paramilitary mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
3 / 14
<p>A mural on the Shankill road shows tributes to Queen Elizabeth in West Belfast, February 21, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural on the Shankill road shows tributes to Queen Elizabeth in West Belfast, February 21, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural on the Shankill road shows tributes to Queen Elizabeth in West Belfast, February 21, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
4 / 14
<p>Golfer Rory McIlroy is pictured on a wall in the Holylands area of Belfast, February 23, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

Golfer Rory McIlroy is pictured on a wall in the Holylands area of Belfast, February 23, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Golfer Rory McIlroy is pictured on a wall in the Holylands area of Belfast, February 23, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
5 / 14
<p>A mural features Irish boxer Michael Conlan winning a bronze medal in the flyweight division at the 2012 Summer Olympics on a wall in the Falls road area of West Belfast February 23, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural features Irish boxer Michael Conlan winning a bronze medal in the flyweight division at the 2012 Summer Olympics on a wall in the Falls road area of West Belfast February 23, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural features Irish boxer Michael Conlan winning a bronze medal in the flyweight division at the 2012 Summer Olympics on a wall in the Falls road area of West Belfast February 23, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
6 / 14
<p>Loyalist paramilitary and political murals are pictured in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

Loyalist paramilitary and political murals are pictured in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Loyalist paramilitary and political murals are pictured in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
7 / 14
<p>A mural in the village of Cushendall in north Antrim commemorates 100 years of the local Gaelic Athletic Club, February 20, 2013.   REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural in the village of Cushendall in north Antrim commemorates 100 years of the local Gaelic Athletic Club, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural in the village of Cushendall in north Antrim commemorates 100 years of the local Gaelic Athletic Club, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
8 / 14
<p>A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013.   REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
9 / 14
<p>A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013.   REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
10 / 14
<p>Pigeons fly past a mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast depicting a Gaelic myth about the claiming of Ulster, February 20, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

Pigeons fly past a mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast depicting a Gaelic myth about the claiming of Ulster, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Pigeons fly past a mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast depicting a Gaelic myth about the claiming of Ulster, February 20, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
11 / 14
<p>A man checks his mobile phone beside a loyalist paramilitary mural in the Waterside area of Derry, February 22, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 22, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton  (BRITAIN- Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 14 FOR PACKAGE 'CHANGING MURALS IN NOR RN IRELAND'
SEARCH 'MURALS' FOR ALL</p>

A man checks his mobile phone beside a loyalist paramilitary mural in the Waterside area of Derry, February 22, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often...more

A man checks his mobile phone beside a loyalist paramilitary mural in the Waterside area of Derry, February 22, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 22, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN- Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 14 FOR PACKAGE 'CHANGING MURALS IN NOR RN IRELAND' SEARCH 'MURALS' FOR ALL

Close
12 / 14
<p>A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
13 / 14
<p>A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013.    REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton</p>

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
14 / 14

Next Slideshows

Animals around the world

A selection of images from the animal kingdom.

Feb 27 2013

Off-duty rebels

Syrian rebels find ways to pass the time when they're not fighting battles with the military.

Feb 27 2013

Meet the Titanic II

Australian mining entrepreneur Clive Palmer unveiled blueprints for Titanic II, a modern replica of the doomed ocean liner, although he stopped short of calling...

Feb 26 2013

Panda hotel

The world's first panda-themed hotel will open in southwest China in May.

Feb 26 2013

MORE IN PICTURES

National strike in Venezuela

National strike in Venezuela

Clashes break out as Venezuela's opposition launches a two-day national strike in a final push to pressure President Nicolas Maduro into abandoning a weekend election for a super-congress.

Hamas 'summer camp'

Hamas 'summer camp'

Hamas stages military-style summer camps for young Palestinians in the Gaza Strip.

Scuffles as Jerusalem holy site reopens

Scuffles as Jerusalem holy site reopens

Thousands of Muslim worshippers surged into Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa Mosque and at least 113 were hurt in scuffles with police after Israel lifted security measures imposed at the sacred site in the face of days of violent protests.

Jeff Bezos now world's richest person

Jeff Bezos now world's richest person

Amazon's Jeff Bezos unseats Bill Gates to become the world's richest person.

Chinese opera revisits Long March

Chinese opera revisits Long March

An opera telling the story of the Red Army's long march in 1935, will have its premiere soon as China marks the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese People's Liberation Army.

MS-13 gang members behind bars

MS-13 gang members behind bars

Members of MS-13, one of two rival notorious criminal gangs in El Salvador, are held in prisons across the crime-ravaged Central American nation.

World Aquatics Championships

World Aquatics Championships

Highlights from the 2017 FINA World Aquatics Championships in Budapest.

Deadly monsoon rains lash India

Deadly monsoon rains lash India

Massive floods triggered by torrential rains have killed more than 100 people across India this month.

Portugal battles raging wildfires

Portugal battles raging wildfires

Over a thousand firefighters continue to battle fierce flames in central Portugal.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast