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Obama, in Asia, says Myanmar trip to encourage democracy

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wave from the steps of Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama will attempt to strike a balance on Monday between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wave from the steps of Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama will attempt to strike a balance on Monday...more

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wave from the steps of Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama will attempt to strike a balance on Monday between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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A U.S. flag is pictured in a pot of plants near a graffiti depicting U.S. President Barack Obama in Yangon November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

A U.S. flag is pictured in a pot of plants near a graffiti depicting U.S. President Barack Obama in Yangon November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between...more

A U.S. flag is pictured in a pot of plants near a graffiti depicting U.S. President Barack Obama in Yangon November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton step aboard Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton step aboard Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between...more

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton step aboard Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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A local newspaper with a picture of U.S President Barack Obama on its front page is sold at a news vendor in Yangon November 18, 2012. Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

A local newspaper with a picture of U.S President Barack Obama on its front page is sold at a news vendor in Yangon November 18, 2012. Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an...more

A local newspaper with a picture of U.S President Barack Obama on its front page is sold at a news vendor in Yangon November 18, 2012. Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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Students hold Myanmar's and U.S. national flags as they wait for U.S. President Barack Obama in front of Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Students hold Myanmar's and U.S. national flags as they wait for U.S. President Barack Obama in front of Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt...more

Students hold Myanmar's and U.S. national flags as they wait for U.S. President Barack Obama in front of Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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Supporters of U.S. President Barack Obama wearing t-shirts depicting his picture hold posters of him and Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi as they wait for his arrival in front of Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Supporters of U.S. President Barack Obama wearing t-shirts depicting his picture hold posters of him and Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi as they wait for his arrival in front of Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Soe...more

Supporters of U.S. President Barack Obama wearing t-shirts depicting his picture hold posters of him and Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi as they wait for his arrival in front of Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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A man stands near a U.S. national flag as he sets up flags on a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

A man stands near a U.S. national flag as he sets up flags on a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement...more

A man stands near a U.S. national flag as he sets up flags on a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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Cars pass along a road to Yangon Air Port where U.S and Myanmar flags are posted in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Minzayar

Cars pass along a road to Yangon Air Port where U.S and Myanmar flags are posted in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an...more

Cars pass along a road to Yangon Air Port where U.S and Myanmar flags are posted in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Minzayar
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A novice Buddhist monk holds out a bowl containing both U.S. dollars and Myanmar Kyats as he collects alms along a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

A novice Buddhist monk holds out a bowl containing both U.S. dollars and Myanmar Kyats as he collects alms along a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement...more

A novice Buddhist monk holds out a bowl containing both U.S. dollars and Myanmar Kyats as he collects alms along a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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Men setup a flagpole bearing the U.S. national flag along a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Men setup a flagpole bearing the U.S. national flag along a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of...more

Men setup a flagpole bearing the U.S. national flag along a street in Yangon November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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A man hangs up a U.S national flag along a street in Yangon, November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

A man hangs up a U.S national flag along a street in Yangon, November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it...more

A man hangs up a U.S national flag along a street in Yangon, November 18, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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A man holds up a local newspaper with a picture of U.S President Barack Obama on its front page in Yangon November 18, 2012. Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

A man holds up a local newspaper with a picture of U.S President Barack Obama on its front page in Yangon November 18, 2012. Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an...more

A man holds up a local newspaper with a picture of U.S President Barack Obama on its front page in Yangon November 18, 2012. Obama said on Sunday that his upcoming trip to Myanmar was not an endorsement of the government, but rather an acknowledgement of the progress it has made in moving towards democracy after decades of military rule. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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U.S. President Barack Obama watches on as Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra arrives at a dinner at Government House in Bangkok, November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama watches on as Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra arrives at a dinner at Government House in Bangkok, November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama watches on as Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra arrives at a dinner at Government House in Bangkok, November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra at Government House in Bangkok, November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra at Government House in Bangkok, November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra at Government House in Bangkok, November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra at Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra at Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra at Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra review the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony at the Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra review the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony at the Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra review the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony at the Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang
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U.S. President Barack Obama prepares to sign a guestbook as Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra looks on, at Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama prepares to sign a guestbook as Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra looks on, at Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama prepares to sign a guestbook as Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra looks on, at Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra review the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony at the Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra review the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony at the Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra review the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony at the Government House in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang
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U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton smile as they stand at the base of the Reclining Buddha during their tour of the Wat Pho Royal Monastery in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton smile as they stand at the base of the Reclining Buddha during their tour of the Wat Pho Royal Monastery in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton smile as they stand at the base of the Reclining Buddha during their tour of the Wat Pho Royal Monastery in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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U.S. President Barack Obama is greeted by Thai dignitaries upon his arrival at Don Muang international airport in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama is greeted by Thai dignitaries upon his arrival at Don Muang international airport in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama is greeted by Thai dignitaries upon his arrival at Don Muang international airport in Bangkok November 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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