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Obama offers praise, pressure on historic Myanmar trip

Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks to the media alongside Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi at her residence in Yangon November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks to the media alongside Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi at her residence in Yangon November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
STRINGER

U.S. President Barack Obama gives a speech at the convocation hall in the University of Yangon November 19, 2012. President Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Minzayar

U.S. President Barack Obama gives a speech at the convocation hall in the University of Yangon November 19, 2012. President Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Myanmar's Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi (R) applaud in the audience as President Barack Obama (not pictured) arrives to deliver remarks at the University of Yangon, November 19, 2012. President Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off...more

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Myanmar's Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi (R) applaud in the audience as President Barack Obama (not pictured) arrives to deliver remarks at the University of Yangon, November 19, 2012. President Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama kisses opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi following their remarks to the media at her residence in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama kisses opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi following their remarks to the media at her residence in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Myanmar's Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi (R) are pictured in the audience as President Barack Obama (not pictured) arrives to deliver remarks at the University of Yangon, November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Myanmar's Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi (R) are pictured in the audience as President Barack Obama (not pictured) arrives to deliver remarks at the University of Yangon, November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
Soe Zeya Tun

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waves as U.S. President Barack Obama mentions her name, during a news conference with Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, after their meeting at Suu Kyi's residence in Yangon November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waves as U.S. President Barack Obama mentions her name, during a news conference with Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, after their meeting at Suu Kyi's residence in Yangon November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama (front 2nd R) and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (front R) tour the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama (front 2nd R) and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (front R) tour the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
Soe Zeya Tun

U.S. President Barack Obama and Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi shakes hands during their meeting at her home in Yangon November 19, 2012.REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

U.S. President Barack Obama and Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi shakes hands during their meeting at her home in Yangon November 19, 2012.REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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Photographer
Soe Zeya Tun

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi embrace during their meeting at Suu Kyi's home in Yangon November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi embrace during their meeting at Suu Kyi's home in Yangon November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama pours water over a statue at a shrine as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton smiles during their visit to the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform....more

U.S. President Barack Obama pours water over a statue at a shrine as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton smiles during their visit to the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama tours the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama tours the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

Foreign tourists and locals watch as U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (not pictured) tour the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Foreign tourists and locals watch as U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (not pictured) tour the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) stands next to Myanmar's President Thein Sein (C) during their meeting in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) stands next to Myanmar's President Thein Sein (C) during their meeting in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama places a floral offering at a shrine during his visit to the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama places a floral offering at a shrine during his visit to the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tour the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tour the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama (L) shakes hands with Myanmar's President Thein Sein during their meeting in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama (L) shakes hands with Myanmar's President Thein Sein during their meeting in Yangon November 19, 2012. Obama became the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar on Monday, trying during a whirlwind six-hour trip to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing for more reform. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

A girl gestures after presenting U.S. President Barack Obama (4th R) with a bouquet of flowers upon his arrival at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. U.S. Secretary of State...more

A girl gestures after presenting U.S. President Barack Obama (4th R) with a bouquet of flowers upon his arrival at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (2nd R) smiles behind Obama. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wave upon arriving at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wave upon arriving at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks with an unidentified official as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton follows behind upon their arrival at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further...more

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks with an unidentified official as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton follows behind upon their arrival at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
STRINGER

U.S. President Barack Obama leaves Yangon International Airport in his car November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Minzayar

U.S. President Barack Obama leaves Yangon International Airport in his car November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama (3rd R) and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) shake hands with unidentified officials upon arriving at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms....more

U.S. President Barack Obama (3rd R) and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) shake hands with unidentified officials upon arriving at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
STRINGER

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waves at the welcoming crowd from inside a car as she leaves Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Minzayar

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waves at the welcoming crowd from inside a car as she leaves Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. REUTERS/Minzayar
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Photographer
JASON REED

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wave from the steps of Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama will attempt to strike a balance on Monday between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wave from the steps of Air Force One in Bangkok November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama will attempt to strike a balance on Monday between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
JASON REED

A girl gestures after presenting U.S. President Barack Obama (R) with a bouquet of flowers upon his arrival at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A girl gestures after presenting U.S. President Barack Obama (R) with a bouquet of flowers upon his arrival at Yangon International Airport November 19, 2012. Obama has become the first serving U.S. president to visit Myanmar, arriving on Monday for a trip that will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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Photographer
Soe Zeya Tun

A U.S. flag is pictured in a pot of plants near a graffiti depicting U.S. President Barack Obama in Yangon November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

A U.S. flag is pictured in a pot of plants near a graffiti depicting U.S. President Barack Obama in Yangon November 19, 2012. Poised to become the first U.S. head of state to travel to Myanmar, Obama on Monday will attempt to strike a balance between praising the government's progress in shaking off military rule and pressing it for further reforms. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
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