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Pakistan cleric ends protest after government concessions

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Photographer
AKHTAR SOOMRO

Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran Muhammad Tahirul Qadri addresses his supporters from behind the window of an armoured vehicle after his meeting with members of Pakistan's coalition government on the fourth day of protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran Muhammad Tahirul Qadri addresses his supporters from behind the window of an armoured vehicle after his meeting with members of Pakistan's coalition government on the fourth day of protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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Photographer
MIAN KHURSHEED

Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran religious organisation Muhammad Tahirul Qadri (L) addresses his supporters from behind the window of an armoured vehicle on the fourth day of protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. To Pakistan's ruling party, a firebrand cleric camped outside parliament with thousands of protesters is looking more and more like the harbinger of their worst fear: a plan by the military to engineer a...more

Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran religious organisation Muhammad Tahirul Qadri (L) addresses his supporters from behind the window of an armoured vehicle on the fourth day of protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. To Pakistan's ruling party, a firebrand cleric camped outside parliament with thousands of protesters is looking more and more like the harbinger of their worst fear: a plan by the military to engineer a "soft coup". In their eyes, Qadri seems like the perfect candidate for such a mission. A practised orator who has electrified crowds with his anti-corruption rhetoric, the doctor of Islamic law leapt into action to back the last power grab by the army in 1999. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed
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Photographer
FAISAL MAHMOOD

Supporters of Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran religious organisation Muhammad Tahirul Qadri celebrate after their leader reached a deal with Pakistan's coalition government on the fourth day of protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood

Supporters of Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran religious organisation Muhammad Tahirul Qadri celebrate after their leader reached a deal with Pakistan's coalition government on the fourth day of protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood
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Photographer
AKHTAR SOOMRO

A member of the coalition partner of the government and Pakistan's political party Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) Farooq Sattar Sufi is seen behind the window of an armoured vehicle as he meets the cleric and leader of Minhaj-ul-Quran Muhammad Tahirul Qadri (C) on the fourth day of Qadri's protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

A member of the coalition partner of the government and Pakistan's political party Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) Farooq Sattar Sufi is seen behind the window of an armoured vehicle as he meets the cleric and leader of Minhaj-ul-Quran Muhammad Tahirul Qadri (C) on the fourth day of Qadri's protests in Islamabad January 17, 2013. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
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