Thomson Reuters

Park wins South Korea presidency, to be first woman leader

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� Kim Hong-Ji / Reuters

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (bottom C) of conservative and right wing ruling Saenuri Party waves to supporters during an election campaign rally in front of a railway station in Busan, about 420 km (261 miles) southeast of Seoul, December 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (bottom C) of conservative and right wing ruling Saenuri Party waves to supporters during an election campaign rally in front of a railway station in Busan, about 420 km (261 miles) southeast of Seoul, December 18, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
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POOL

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye waves as she holds a bouquet of flowers after arriving at the headquarters of the ruling Saenuri party in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Jae-Hwan/Pool

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye waves as she holds a bouquet of flowers after arriving at the headquarters of the ruling Saenuri party in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Jae-Hwan/Pool
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LEE JAE-WON

The winner of South Korea's presidential election, Park Geun-hye holds a bouquet in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

The winner of South Korea's presidential election, Park Geun-hye holds a bouquet in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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LEE JAE-WON

The winner of South Korea's presidential election, Park Geun-hye smiles as she receives a banquet in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

The winner of South Korea's presidential election, Park Geun-hye smiles as she receives a banquet in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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KIM HONG-JI

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye waves to her supporters as she leaves from the headquarters of the ruling Saenuri party in Seoul, December 19, 2012. The daughter of a former military ruler took a commanding lead in South Korea's presidential election on Wednesday, putting her on track to become the country's first woman head of state. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye waves to her supporters as she leaves from the headquarters of the ruling Saenuri party in Seoul, December 19, 2012. The daughter of a former military ruler took a commanding lead in South Korea's presidential election on Wednesday, putting her on track to become the country's first woman head of state. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
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LEE JAE-WON

The winner of South Korea's presidential election, Park Geun-hye waves to supporters in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

The winner of South Korea's presidential election, Park Geun-hye waves to supporters in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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HANDOUT

In this undated handout photo received December 19, 2012, South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (C) poses with her father and then-President Park Chung-hee and her mother Yuk Young-soo along with her younger brother and sister in Seoul. REUTERS/The Saenuri Party/Handout

In this undated handout photo received December 19, 2012, South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (C) poses with her father and then-President Park Chung-hee and her mother Yuk Young-soo along with her younger brother and sister in Seoul. REUTERS/The Saenuri Party/Handout
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HANDOUT

In this undated handout photo received December 19, 2012, the winner of South Korea's 2012 presidential election Park Geun-hye attends a funeral for her father and then President Park Chung-hee, who was assassinated by his aide in 1979. REUTERS/The Saenuri Party/Handout

In this undated handout photo received December 19, 2012, the winner of South Korea's 2012 presidential election Park Geun-hye attends a funeral for her father and then President Park Chung-hee, who was assassinated by his aide in 1979. REUTERS/The Saenuri Party/Handout
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HANDOUT

In this undated handout photo received December 19, 2012, the winner of South Korea's 2012 presidential election Park Geun-hye meets children when she served as her father and then-President Park Chung-hee's first lady in the 1970s, after her mother Yuk Young-soo was assassinated by a North Korean-backed gunman. REUTERS/The Saenuri Party/Handout

In this undated handout photo received December 19, 2012, the winner of South Korea's 2012 presidential election Park Geun-hye meets children when she served as her father and then-President Park Chung-hee's first lady in the 1970s, after her mother Yuk Young-soo was assassinated by a North Korean-backed gunman. REUTERS/The Saenuri Party/Handout
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YONHAP

Supporters of South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye react as they watch live TV broadcasting about the ballot tally at the birthplace of her father and former President Park Chung-hee in Kumi, about 260 km (162 miles) southeast of Seoul , December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Son Dae-Sung/Yonhap

Supporters of South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye react as they watch live TV broadcasting about the ballot tally at the birthplace of her father and former President Park Chung-hee in Kumi, about 260 km (162 miles) southeast of Seoul , December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Son Dae-Sung/Yonhap
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POOL

Unidentified members of the opposition Democratic United Party watch TV news reporting exit polls on their presidential candidate Moon Jae-in in South Korea's presidential elections at the party headquarters in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Ahn Young-joon/Pool

Unidentified members of the opposition Democratic United Party watch TV news reporting exit polls on their presidential candidate Moon Jae-in in South Korea's presidential elections at the party headquarters in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Ahn Young-joon/Pool
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LEE JAE-WON

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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LEE JAE-WON

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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POOL

Unidentified members of the opposition Democratic United Party watch television news reporting exit polls on their presidential candidate Moon Jae-in in South Korea's presidential elections at the party headquarters in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Ahn Young-joon/Pool

Unidentified members of the opposition Democratic United Party watch television news reporting exit polls on their presidential candidate Moon Jae-in in South Korea's presidential elections at the party headquarters in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Ahn Young-joon/Pool
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LEE JAE-WON

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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LEE JAE-WON

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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LEE JAE-WON

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Election officials count the ballots of the presidential election in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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LEE JAE-WON

An elderly woman is assisted in casting her ballot in the presidential election at a polling station in Nonsan, about 190 km (118 miles) south of Seoul, December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

An elderly woman is assisted in casting her ballot in the presidential election at a polling station in Nonsan, about 190 km (118 miles) south of Seoul, December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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LEE JAE-WON

Yoo Bok-yeob (L), 72, a village schoolmaster, casts his ballot with his family member in the presidential election at a polling station in Nonsan, about 190 km (118 miles) south of Seoul, December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Yoo Bok-yeob (L), 72, a village schoolmaster, casts his ballot with his family member in the presidential election at a polling station in Nonsan, about 190 km (118 miles) south of Seoul, December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
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KIM HONG-JI

A combination photograph shows South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (L) of conservative and right wing ruling Saenuri Party casting her ballot, and Moon Jae-in (R), former human rights lawyer and presidential candidate of the main opposition Democratic United Party, attending a campaign encouraging people to vote, in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

A combination photograph shows South Korea's presidential candidate Park Geun-hye (L) of conservative and right wing ruling Saenuri Party casting her ballot, and Moon Jae-in (R), former human rights lawyer and presidential candidate of the main opposition Democratic United Party, attending a campaign encouraging people to vote, in Seoul December 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
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