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Pictures | Tue May 15, 2012 | 5:25pm EDT

Portfolio: Danilo Krstanovic

<p>Bosnian women wash clothes in the Miljacka river in front of the burned out national library in Sarajevo, October 1992. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic
</p>

Bosnian women wash clothes in the Miljacka river in front of the burned out national library in Sarajevo, October 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Bosnian women wash clothes in the Miljacka river in front of the burned out national library in Sarajevo, October 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>The bodies of a man and woman lie along the street in the Sarajevo neighborhood of Alipasino Polje after they were hit by grenade shrapnel in 1992. 


REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

The bodies of a man and woman lie along the street in the Sarajevo neighborhood of Alipasino Polje after they were hit by grenade shrapnel in 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

The bodies of a man and woman lie along the street in the Sarajevo neighborhood of Alipasino Polje after they were hit by grenade shrapnel in 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A building burns after being shelled in the Pofalici district in Sarajevo, April 1992. 


 REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic </p>

A building burns after being shelled in the Pofalici district in Sarajevo, April 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A building burns after being shelled in the Pofalici district in Sarajevo, April 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>The wreckage of a tram stands in a street following shelling in the Skenderija district in Sarajevo, March 1992. 


REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

The wreckage of a tram stands in a street following shelling in the Skenderija district in Sarajevo, March 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

The wreckage of a tram stands in a street following shelling in the Skenderija district in Sarajevo, March 1992. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Two Bosnian Muslim soldiers take up positions in a destroyed building at the front line in the beseiged Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, August 16, 1993.  

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Two Bosnian Muslim soldiers take up positions in a destroyed building at the front line in the beseiged Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, August 16, 1993. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Two Bosnian Muslim soldiers take up positions in a destroyed building at the front line in the beseiged Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, August 16, 1993. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Sarajevo residents take cover from sniper fire behind a United Nations Protection Force armored vehicle in 1993. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Sarajevo residents take cover from sniper fire behind a United Nations Protection Force armored vehicle in 1993. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Sarajevo residents take cover from sniper fire behind a United Nations Protection Force armored vehicle in 1993. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>An elderly woman struck by mortar shell fragments lies dead beside a school as people pass by her body in Sarajevo, January 11, 1994. 

	
REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

An elderly woman struck by mortar shell fragments lies dead beside a school as people pass by her body in Sarajevo, January 11, 1994. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

An elderly woman struck by mortar shell fragments lies dead beside a school as people pass by her body in Sarajevo, January 11, 1994. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Children peer through a barred window in the besieged Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, May 14, 1995. 

	
REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Children peer through a barred window in the besieged Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, May 14, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Children peer through a barred window in the besieged Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, May 14, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Two-year-old Neira Kameric stands beside a mortar scar laid with flowers and a sign 'Beware Sniper' at a commemoration for children killed in the three-and-a-half years of war, November 2, 1995. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Two-year-old Neira Kameric stands beside a mortar scar laid with flowers and a sign 'Beware Sniper' at a commemoration for children killed in the three-and-a-half years of war, November 2, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Two-year-old Neira Kameric stands beside a mortar scar laid with flowers and a sign 'Beware Sniper' at a commemoration for children killed in the three-and-a-half years of war, November 2, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Dead and wounded lie outside the Sarajevo city indoor market after a mortar shell exploded at the entrance to the building, killing 32 and wounding 40, August 28, 1995.   

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Dead and wounded lie outside the Sarajevo city indoor market after a mortar shell exploded at the entrance to the building, killing 32 and wounding 40, August 28, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Dead and wounded lie outside the Sarajevo city indoor market after a mortar shell exploded at the entrance to the building, killing 32 and wounding 40, August 28, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A French UN soldier looks in amazement after a huge explosion rocked the center of Sarajevo as heavy fighting erupted in and around the Bosnian capital, June 16, 1995.  

	
REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

A French UN soldier looks in amazement after a huge explosion rocked the center of Sarajevo as heavy fighting erupted in and around the Bosnian capital, June 16, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A French UN soldier looks in amazement after a huge explosion rocked the center of Sarajevo as heavy fighting erupted in and around the Bosnian capital, June 16, 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Two Muslim women visit the badly-damaged area of Otes, the last Serb-held suburb of Sarajevo to come under Croat-Muslim control, March 19, 1996. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Two Muslim women visit the badly-damaged area of Otes, the last Serb-held suburb of Sarajevo to come under Croat-Muslim control, March 19, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Two Muslim women visit the badly-damaged area of Otes, the last Serb-held suburb of Sarajevo to come under Croat-Muslim control, March 19, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A lady cleans a red carpet in front of a Bosnian government army honor guard in preparation for the visit of Slovenian President Milan Kucan in Sarajevo, February 13, 1996. 
	
REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

A lady cleans a red carpet in front of a Bosnian government army honor guard in preparation for the visit of Slovenian President Milan Kucan in Sarajevo, February 13, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A lady cleans a red carpet in front of a Bosnian government army honor guard in preparation for the visit of Slovenian President Milan Kucan in Sarajevo, February 13, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A Bosnian Muslim woman covers her face as a convoy of buses with more than five hundred refugees who had been attempting to visit relatives' graves in the Bosnian Serb-held town of Trnovo returned back to Sarajevo, April 29, 1996. The convoy was attacked by an angrycrowd of Bosnian Serbs and forced to abandon the trip.

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

</p>

A Bosnian Muslim woman covers her face as a convoy of buses with more than five hundred refugees who had been attempting to visit relatives' graves in the Bosnian Serb-held town of Trnovo returned back to Sarajevo, April 29, 1996. The convoy was...more

A Bosnian Muslim woman covers her face as a convoy of buses with more than five hundred refugees who had been attempting to visit relatives' graves in the Bosnian Serb-held town of Trnovo returned back to Sarajevo, April 29, 1996. The convoy was attacked by an angrycrowd of Bosnian Serbs and forced to abandon the trip. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A Bosnian man works to repair a house caught between the frontlines in Stupsko Brdo, an extremely damaged suburb of Sarajevo, June 4, 1996. 


REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

</p>

A Bosnian man works to repair a house caught between the frontlines in Stupsko Brdo, an extremely damaged suburb of Sarajevo, June 4, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A Bosnian man works to repair a house caught between the frontlines in Stupsko Brdo, an extremely damaged suburb of Sarajevo, June 4, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Two Bosnians take debris out of a destroyed building  in Sarajevo's suburb of Dobrinja, which formed the frontline between warring Bosnian Muslim and Serbs forces, December 16, 1996. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Two Bosnians take debris out of a destroyed building in Sarajevo's suburb of Dobrinja, which formed the frontline between warring Bosnian Muslim and Serbs forces, December 16, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Two Bosnians take debris out of a destroyed building in Sarajevo's suburb of Dobrinja, which formed the frontline between warring Bosnian Muslim and Serbs forces, December 16, 1996. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>The Bey's mosque in old Sarajevo overflows with pilgrims attending Friday prayers to mark the start of Ramadan, January 10, 1997.  

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

The Bey's mosque in old Sarajevo overflows with pilgrims attending Friday prayers to mark the start of Ramadan, January 10, 1997. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

The Bey's mosque in old Sarajevo overflows with pilgrims attending Friday prayers to mark the start of Ramadan, January 10, 1997. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Bosnian Muslims pray for the souls of dead Muslim soldiers at the Kovaci cemetery in Sarajevo, February 10, 1997. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic </p>

Bosnian Muslims pray for the souls of dead Muslim soldiers at the Kovaci cemetery in Sarajevo, February 10, 1997. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Bosnian Muslims pray for the souls of dead Muslim soldiers at the Kovaci cemetery in Sarajevo, February 10, 1997. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Muslim boys from Yugoslavia's western region of Sanjak take some rest in a collective center in Rakovica, near Sarajevo, March 31, 1999. The boys were some of up to 6,000 Muslims from the Sanjak region to arrive in Bosnia following NATO's air strikes against Serbia over Kosovo. 


REUTERS/</p>

Muslim boys from Yugoslavia's western region of Sanjak take some rest in a collective center in Rakovica, near Sarajevo, March 31, 1999. The boys were some of up to 6,000 Muslims from the Sanjak region to arrive in Bosnia following NATO's air strikes...more

Muslim boys from Yugoslavia's western region of Sanjak take some rest in a collective center in Rakovica, near Sarajevo, March 31, 1999. The boys were some of up to 6,000 Muslims from the Sanjak region to arrive in Bosnia following NATO's air strikes against Serbia over Kosovo. REUTERS/

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<p>A destroyed railway track near the town of Rudo, a nine-kilometer stretch of the main line between Serbia and Montenegro which passes through eastern Bosnia, lies shattered after the track was closed by NATO forces to prevent any Yugoslav military forces from crossing Bosnian territory between Serbia and Montenegro, April 3, 1999. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic
</p>

A destroyed railway track near the town of Rudo, a nine-kilometer stretch of the main line between Serbia and Montenegro which passes through eastern Bosnia, lies shattered after the track was closed by NATO forces to prevent any Yugoslav military...more

A destroyed railway track near the town of Rudo, a nine-kilometer stretch of the main line between Serbia and Montenegro which passes through eastern Bosnia, lies shattered after the track was closed by NATO forces to prevent any Yugoslav military forces from crossing Bosnian territory between Serbia and Montenegro, April 3, 1999. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A month-old baby belonging to a family of Kosovar Albanians that arrived in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo days earlier sleeps on the concrete floor of an abandoned railway station together with about a hundred other Kosovar refugees, April 17, 1999. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

A month-old baby belonging to a family of Kosovar Albanians that arrived in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo days earlier sleeps on the concrete floor of an abandoned railway station together with about a hundred other Kosovar refugees, April 17, 1999....more

A month-old baby belonging to a family of Kosovar Albanians that arrived in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo days earlier sleeps on the concrete floor of an abandoned railway station together with about a hundred other Kosovar refugees, April 17, 1999. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A member of the special police unit  jumps over a gulley trying to find the remains of seven houses that disappeared in a landslide near the central Bosnian town of Zenica  February 11, 2000. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

A member of the special police unit jumps over a gulley trying to find the remains of seven houses that disappeared in a landslide near the central Bosnian town of Zenica February 11, 2000. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A member of the special police unit jumps over a gulley trying to find the remains of seven houses that disappeared in a landslide near the central Bosnian town of Zenica February 11, 2000. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A Serb pensioner looks out of the window of her house  in a suburb of Sarajevo which has been disputed ever since Bosnia's 1992-5 conflict, April 24, 2001. Earlier in the day, an international arbitrator ruled that the disputed part of the surburb, which was previously in Serb-controlled territory, should be part of Bosnia's Muslim-Croat Federation.
	
REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

A Serb pensioner looks out of the window of her house in a suburb of Sarajevo which has been disputed ever since Bosnia's 1992-5 conflict, April 24, 2001. Earlier in the day, an international arbitrator ruled that the disputed part of the surburb,...more

A Serb pensioner looks out of the window of her house in a suburb of Sarajevo which has been disputed ever since Bosnia's 1992-5 conflict, April 24, 2001. Earlier in the day, an international arbitrator ruled that the disputed part of the surburb, which was previously in Serb-controlled territory, should be part of Bosnia's Muslim-Croat Federation. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Bosnian Muslims walk among the laid-out remains of people exhumed from a mass grave at an identification center in the central Bosnian town of Visoko, May 29, 2001. 

	
REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Bosnian Muslims walk among the laid-out remains of people exhumed from a mass grave at an identification center in the central Bosnian town of Visoko, May 29, 2001. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Bosnian Muslims walk among the laid-out remains of people exhumed from a mass grave at an identification center in the central Bosnian town of Visoko, May 29, 2001. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A forensic expert shows a wallet with a bank card belonging to Muslim Ekrem Hadzimuratovic which was found in the Piljak pit on the Malusa Mountain in eastern Bosnia, June 10, 2001. 


REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

A forensic expert shows a wallet with a bank card belonging to Muslim Ekrem Hadzimuratovic which was found in the Piljak pit on the Malusa Mountain in eastern Bosnia, June 10, 2001. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A forensic expert shows a wallet with a bank card belonging to Muslim Ekrem Hadzimuratovic which was found in the Piljak pit on the Malusa Mountain in eastern Bosnia, June 10, 2001. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Construction workers pause while working on war damaged central government building in Sarajevo, November 18, 2005. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Construction workers pause while working on war damaged central government building in Sarajevo, November 18, 2005. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Construction workers pause while working on war damaged central government building in Sarajevo, November 18, 2005. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A Bosnian Muslim woman cries near the newly prepared grave for her relative after his body was buried at a joint cemetery for the Srebrenica victims in Potocari, eastern Bosnia, July 11, 2006. 


REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic  </p>

A Bosnian Muslim woman cries near the newly prepared grave for her relative after his body was buried at a joint cemetery for the Srebrenica victims in Potocari, eastern Bosnia, July 11, 2006. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A Bosnian Muslim woman cries near the newly prepared grave for her relative after his body was buried at a joint cemetery for the Srebrenica victims in Potocari, eastern Bosnia, July 11, 2006. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>Workers carry a coffin past other coffins of newly identified Srebrenica victims at an abandoned battery factory in Potocari, eastern Bosnia, July 10, 2006.


REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic</p>

Workers carry a coffin past other coffins of newly identified Srebrenica victims at an abandoned battery factory in Potocari, eastern Bosnia, July 10, 2006. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

Workers carry a coffin past other coffins of newly identified Srebrenica victims at an abandoned battery factory in Potocari, eastern Bosnia, July 10, 2006. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A Bosnian Muslim woman embraces her daughter at  the Kovaci cemetary in the capital Sarajevo on the second day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, October 24, 2006.  
 REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic </p>

A Bosnian Muslim woman embraces her daughter at the Kovaci cemetary in the capital Sarajevo on the second day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, October 24, 2006. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

A Bosnian Muslim woman embraces her daughter at the Kovaci cemetary in the capital Sarajevo on the second day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, October 24, 2006. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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<p>A Bosnian woman walks near a flower on the ground during the 13th anniversary of the shelling from neighbouring hills by Bosnian Serb forces in Sarajevo, August 28, 2008. The flower was laid at the spot where a 120 millimeter shell killed 43 Sarajevans in 1995. 

REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic  </p>

A Bosnian woman walks near a flower on the ground during the 13th anniversary of the shelling from neighbouring hills by Bosnian Serb forces in Sarajevo, August 28, 2008. The flower was laid at the spot where a 120 millimeter shell killed 43...more

A Bosnian woman walks near a flower on the ground during the 13th anniversary of the shelling from neighbouring hills by Bosnian Serb forces in Sarajevo, August 28, 2008. The flower was laid at the spot where a 120 millimeter shell killed 43 Sarajevans in 1995. REUTERS/Danilo Krstanovic

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