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Restaurants reopen with bottled water after West Virginia spill

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Water is distributed to residents at the South Charleston Community Center in Charleston, West Virginia, January 10, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky

Water is distributed to residents at the South Charleston Community Center in Charleston, West Virginia, January 10, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky
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LISA HECHESKY

Cathy Mabe of Spring Hill, West Virginia makes use of a couple of watering cans to carry water at a bring-your-own-containers water filling station in South Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky

Cathy Mabe of Spring Hill, West Virginia makes use of a couple of watering cans to carry water at a bring-your-own-containers water filling station in South Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky
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LISA HECHESKY

Desaree Rush of Charleston loads up her van with water containers after making a water pick up for the elderly residents in her neighborhood in Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014.. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky

Desaree Rush of Charleston loads up her van with water containers after making a water pick up for the elderly residents in her neighborhood in Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014.. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky
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LISA HECHESKY

A sign on the door notifies customers that a restaurant is closed due to the water emergency in South Charleston, West Virginia January 11, 2014. Up to 300,000 West Virginia residents spent a second night unable to bathe, shower or drink tap water on Saturday after a chemical spill into the Elk River near the state capital of Charleston, although chemical levels were declining. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky

A sign on the door notifies customers that a restaurant is closed due to the water emergency in South Charleston, West Virginia January 11, 2014. Up to 300,000 West Virginia residents spent a second night unable to bathe, shower or drink tap water on Saturday after a chemical spill into the Elk River near the state capital of Charleston, although chemical levels were declining. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky
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LISA HECHESKY

Boats sit in the Elk River in front of the Freedom Industries plant in Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky

Boats sit in the Elk River in front of the Freedom Industries plant in Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky
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LISA HECHESKY

A containment boom floats in the Elk River near the Freedom Industries plant in Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky

A containment boom floats in the Elk River near the Freedom Industries plant in Charleston, West Virginia, January 11, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky
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STRINGER

Water is distributed to residents at the South Charleston Community Center in Charleston, West Virginia, January 10, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky

Water is distributed to residents at the South Charleston Community Center in Charleston, West Virginia, January 10, 2014. REUTERS/Lisa Hechesky
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