Edition:
United States
Pictures | Wed Aug 23, 2017 | 4:25pm EDT

Ripple effects of Charlottesville

Workers from the City of Charlottesville Parks Department cover the statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson in a black tarp in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide

Workers from the City of Charlottesville Parks Department cover the statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson in a black tarp in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide

Workers from the City of Charlottesville Parks Department cover the statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson in a black tarp in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Close
1 / 32
The statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson is shown covered in black tarp as Dr. Wes Bellamy, the vice mayor of Charlottesville, looks on in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide

The statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson is shown covered in black tarp as Dr. Wes Bellamy, the vice mayor of Charlottesville, looks on in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide

The statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson is shown covered in black tarp as Dr. Wes Bellamy, the vice mayor of Charlottesville, looks on in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Close
2 / 32
The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is shown covered in black tarp in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. Matt Talhelm/WVIR-TV NBC29/Handout via REUTERS

The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is shown covered in black tarp in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. Matt Talhelm/WVIR-TV NBC29/Handout via REUTERS

The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is shown covered in black tarp in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 23, 2017. Matt Talhelm/WVIR-TV NBC29/Handout via REUTERS
Close
3 / 32
Police and sheriffs grapple with protesters after a demonstration turned violent during a protest against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

Police and sheriffs grapple with protesters after a demonstration turned violent during a protest against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August...more

Police and sheriffs grapple with protesters after a demonstration turned violent during a protest against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Close
4 / 32
Police wearing riot gear guard a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina during a demonstration for its removal in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

Police wearing riot gear guard a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina during a demonstration for its removal in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

Police wearing riot gear guard a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina during a demonstration for its removal in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Close
5 / 32
A protester yells at a policeman after violence erupted at a demonstration against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

A protester yells at a policeman after violence erupted at a demonstration against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017....more

A protester yells at a policeman after violence erupted at a demonstration against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Close
6 / 32
Protesters pound on a door to a campus building where security officials were holding their colleague during unrest at a demonstration against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

Protesters pound on a door to a campus building where security officials were holding their colleague during unrest at a demonstration against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in...more

Protesters pound on a door to a campus building where security officials were holding their colleague during unrest at a demonstration against a statue of a Confederate soldier nicknamed Silent Sam on the campus of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Close
7 / 32
Workers remove a Confederate General Robert E. Lee statue from the south mall of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Spillman

Workers remove a Confederate General Robert E. Lee statue from the south mall of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Spillman

Workers remove a Confederate General Robert E. Lee statue from the south mall of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Spillman
Close
8 / 32
Red paint is seen splattered on the base of a statue of Confederate General Albert Pike during a demonstration calling for its removal in Washington, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

Red paint is seen splattered on the base of a statue of Confederate General Albert Pike during a demonstration calling for its removal in Washington, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

Red paint is seen splattered on the base of a statue of Confederate General Albert Pike during a demonstration calling for its removal in Washington, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Close
9 / 32
Activists join hands during a Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston, West Virginia, August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcus Constantino

Activists join hands during a Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston, West Virginia, August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcus Constantino

Activists join hands during a Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston, West Virginia, August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcus Constantino
Close
10 / 32
Workers remove Confederate Postmaster General John Reagan statue from the south mall of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Spillman

Workers remove Confederate Postmaster General John Reagan statue from the south mall of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Spillman

Workers remove Confederate Postmaster General John Reagan statue from the south mall of the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Spillman
Close
11 / 32
Rachel See, 31, of Baker, West Virginia, shouts at activists calling for the removal of a statue of Confederate general Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson after a Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston, West Virginia, August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcus Constantino

Rachel See, 31, of Baker, West Virginia, shouts at activists calling for the removal of a statue of Confederate general Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson after a Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston, West Virginia, August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcus...more

Rachel See, 31, of Baker, West Virginia, shouts at activists calling for the removal of a statue of Confederate general Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson after a Black Lives Matter rally in Charleston, West Virginia, August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcus Constantino
Close
12 / 32
An unidentified man, center, who said he was for free speech and not the confederacy, argues with anti-white supremacists over the removal of Confederate monuments before the start of the "Dallas Against White Supremacy" rally at City Hall Plaza in Dallas, Texas, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Rex Curry

An unidentified man, center, who said he was for free speech and not the confederacy, argues with anti-white supremacists over the removal of Confederate monuments before the start of the "Dallas Against White Supremacy" rally at City Hall Plaza in...more

An unidentified man, center, who said he was for free speech and not the confederacy, argues with anti-white supremacists over the removal of Confederate monuments before the start of the "Dallas Against White Supremacy" rally at City Hall Plaza in Dallas, Texas, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Rex Curry
Close
13 / 32
People protest in front of a Confederate monument before the start of the "Dallas Against White Supremacy" rally at City Hall Plaza in Dallas, Texas, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Rex Curry

People protest in front of a Confederate monument before the start of the "Dallas Against White Supremacy" rally at City Hall Plaza in Dallas, Texas, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Rex Curry

People protest in front of a Confederate monument before the start of the "Dallas Against White Supremacy" rally at City Hall Plaza in Dallas, Texas, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Rex Curry
Close
14 / 32
Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens hold a rally where the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and early member of the Ku Klux Klan, stands over his grave in Health Sciences Park in Memphis, Tennessee, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Karen Pulfer Focht

Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens hold a rally where the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and early member of the Ku Klux Klan, stands over his grave in Health Sciences Park in Memphis, Tennessee, August 19, 2017....more

Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens hold a rally where the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and early member of the Ku Klux Klan, stands over his grave in Health Sciences Park in Memphis, Tennessee, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Karen Pulfer Focht
Close
15 / 32
Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens hold a rally where the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and early member of the Ku Klux Klan, stands over his grave in Health Sciences Park in Memphis, Tennessee, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Karen Pulfer Focht

Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens hold a rally where the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and early member of the Ku Klux Klan, stands over his grave in Health Sciences Park in Memphis, Tennessee, August 19, 2017....more

Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens hold a rally where the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and early member of the Ku Klux Klan, stands over his grave in Health Sciences Park in Memphis, Tennessee, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Karen Pulfer Focht
Close
16 / 32
Members of a racial justice organization hang a banner, reading "Louisville, Take It Down" on a monument to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman in Louisville, Kentucky, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of a racial justice organization hang a banner, reading "Louisville, Take It Down" on a monument to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman in Louisville, Kentucky, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Members of a racial justice organization hang a banner, reading "Louisville, Take It Down" on a monument to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman in Louisville, Kentucky, August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Close
17 / 32
A framed picture of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, with an inscription, is placed by someone in the park formerly dedicated to him and the site of recent violent demonstrations in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

A framed picture of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, with an inscription, is placed by someone in the park formerly dedicated to him and the site of recent violent demonstrations in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

A framed picture of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, with an inscription, is placed by someone in the park formerly dedicated to him and the site of recent violent demonstrations in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Close
18 / 32
A masked counter-protester rests in front of the base of a Confederate statue scrawled with the slogan "Death to the Klan" as demonstrators gather after a report of a rally by white nationalists was disseminated over social media in Durham, North Carolina, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

A masked counter-protester rests in front of the base of a Confederate statue scrawled with the slogan "Death to the Klan" as demonstrators gather after a report of a rally by white nationalists was disseminated over social media in Durham, North...more

A masked counter-protester rests in front of the base of a Confederate statue scrawled with the slogan "Death to the Klan" as demonstrators gather after a report of a rally by white nationalists was disseminated over social media in Durham, North Carolina, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Close
19 / 32
Counter-protesters, who gathered in response to a report disseminated on social media of a rally by white nationalists, burn a mock Confederate flag in Durham, North Carolina, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Michael Galinsky

Counter-protesters, who gathered in response to a report disseminated on social media of a rally by white nationalists, burn a mock Confederate flag in Durham, North Carolina, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Michael Galinsky

Counter-protesters, who gathered in response to a report disseminated on social media of a rally by white nationalists, burn a mock Confederate flag in Durham, North Carolina, August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Michael Galinsky
Close
20 / 32
Damage is seen done to the face of a statue of Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee at Duke University's Duke Chapel in Durham, North Carolina, August 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

Damage is seen done to the face of a statue of Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee at Duke University's Duke Chapel in Durham, North Carolina, August 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

Damage is seen done to the face of a statue of Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee at Duke University's Duke Chapel in Durham, North Carolina, August 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Close
21 / 32
A Duke University security guard keeps watch near the defaced statue of Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee, which stands next to a statue of Thomas Jefferson, at Duke Chapel in Durham, North Carolina, August 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

A Duke University security guard keeps watch near the defaced statue of Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee, which stands next to a statue of Thomas Jefferson, at Duke Chapel in Durham, North Carolina, August 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

A Duke University security guard keeps watch near the defaced statue of Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee, which stands next to a statue of Thomas Jefferson, at Duke Chapel in Durham, North Carolina, August 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Close
22 / 32
Workers remove the monuments to Robert E. Lee, commander of the pro-slavery Confederate army in the American Civil War, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, a Confederate general, from Wyman Park in Baltimore, Maryland, August 16, 2017. Courtesy of Alec MacGillis/ProPublica via REUTERS

Workers remove the monuments to Robert E. Lee, commander of the pro-slavery Confederate army in the American Civil War, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, a Confederate general, from Wyman Park in Baltimore, Maryland, August 16, 2017. Courtesy of Alec...more

Workers remove the monuments to Robert E. Lee, commander of the pro-slavery Confederate army in the American Civil War, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, a Confederate general, from Wyman Park in Baltimore, Maryland, August 16, 2017. Courtesy of Alec MacGillis/ProPublica via REUTERS
Close
23 / 32
Workers remove the monuments to Robert E. Lee, commander of the pro-slavery Confederate army in the American Civil War, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, a Confederate general, from Wyman Park in Baltimore, Maryland, August 16, 2017. Courtesy of Alec MacGillis/ProPublica via REUTERS

Workers remove the monuments to Robert E. Lee, commander of the pro-slavery Confederate army in the American Civil War, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, a Confederate general, from Wyman Park in Baltimore, Maryland, August 16, 2017. Courtesy of Alec...more

Workers remove the monuments to Robert E. Lee, commander of the pro-slavery Confederate army in the American Civil War, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, a Confederate general, from Wyman Park in Baltimore, Maryland, August 16, 2017. Courtesy of Alec MacGillis/ProPublica via REUTERS
Close
24 / 32
A tourist walks past a papered-over column where a vandal scrawled obscene graffiti in spray paint on the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, August 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

A tourist walks past a papered-over column where a vandal scrawled obscene graffiti in spray paint on the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, August 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

A tourist walks past a papered-over column where a vandal scrawled obscene graffiti in spray paint on the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, August 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Close
25 / 32
Workers clean up broken glass after the Holocaust Memorial was vandalized in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Workers clean up broken glass after the Holocaust Memorial was vandalized in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Workers clean up broken glass after the Holocaust Memorial was vandalized in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Close
26 / 32
Workers clean up after a glass panel etched with numbers representing victims was broken at the Holocaust Memorial in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Workers clean up after a glass panel etched with numbers representing victims was broken at the Holocaust Memorial in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Workers clean up after a glass panel etched with numbers representing victims was broken at the Holocaust Memorial in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Close
27 / 32
Workers clean up broken glass after the Holocaust Memorial was vandalized in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Workers clean up broken glass after the Holocaust Memorial was vandalized in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Workers clean up broken glass after the Holocaust Memorial was vandalized in Boston, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Close
28 / 32
Municipal workers attempt to remove paint from a monument dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman that was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Municipal workers attempt to remove paint from a monument dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman that was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Municipal workers attempt to remove paint from a monument dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman that was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Close
29 / 32
A municipal worker attempts to remove paint from a monument dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman that was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A municipal worker attempts to remove paint from a monument dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman that was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A municipal worker attempts to remove paint from a monument dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman that was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Close
30 / 32
A plaque dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman is seen after it was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A plaque dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman is seen after it was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

A plaque dedicated to Confederate soldier John B. Castleman is seen after it was vandalized late Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Close
31 / 32
Minutes after a protest demanding its removal, a man drives circles around the monument dedicated to Confederate Major John B. Castleman with a sign reading "Stop Destroying America's Historical Monuments!" in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Minutes after a protest demanding its removal, a man drives circles around the monument dedicated to Confederate Major John B. Castleman with a sign reading "Stop Destroying America's Historical Monuments!" in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017....more

Minutes after a protest demanding its removal, a man drives circles around the monument dedicated to Confederate Major John B. Castleman with a sign reading "Stop Destroying America's Historical Monuments!" in Louisville, Kentucky, August 14, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Close
32 / 32

Next Slideshows

Trump visits Arizona

President Donald Trump tours a Customs and Border Protection facility, meets with Marines, and holds a campaign rally in Arizona.

Aug 23 2017

Kim Jong Un's chemistry briefing

The North Korean leader was briefed about the process of manufacturing intercontinental ballistic missile warhead tips and solid-fuel rocket engines during his...

Aug 23 2017

Iraqi forces surround Islamic State

Iraqi forces launch an offensive to oust Islamic State from the city of Tal Afar.

Aug 23 2017

Typhoon Hato slams Hong Kong

Typhoon Hato strikes Hong Kong, the first category 10 storm to hit the city since 2012.

Aug 23 2017

MORE IN PICTURES

Hurricane Maria slams Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria slams Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria dumped heavy rain on the U.S. territory after destroying buildings and knocking out power to the entire island.

Alabama Senate race heats up

Alabama Senate race heats up

Political big guns show up to support rival candidates ahead of Alabama's Senate special election.

Inside the U.N. General Assembly

Inside the U.N. General Assembly

World leaders from 193 member states gather for the global body's annual meeting.

Cleaning up in the Florida Keys

Cleaning up in the Florida Keys

Residents survey the damage after Hurricane Irma blasts the Florida Keys.

Melania in the garden

Melania in the garden

First lady Melania Trump tends to the White House garden with children from a local Boys and Girls Club.

Jewish New Year

Jewish New Year

Jewish faithful around the world celebrate Rosh Hashanah.

Countdown to German election

Countdown to German election

On the campaign trail as Germans prepare to go to the polls.

Mexico reels after devastating earthquake

Mexico reels after devastating earthquake

Rescuers toil to find survivors in the rubble after a devastating earthquake in central Mexico killed more than 200 people.

Milan Fashion Week

Milan Fashion Week

Backstage and collection highlights from Milan.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast