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Ruins of Pompeii

<p>A sign, which reads: "No Entry", hangs on a perimeter fence in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013.  REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A sign, which reads: "No Entry", hangs on a perimeter fence in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

A sign, which reads: "No Entry", hangs on a perimeter fence in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Workers carry equipment in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

Workers carry equipment in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

Workers carry equipment in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>A restorer works in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A restorer works in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

A restorer works in the ancient Roman city Pompeii, which was buried in AD 79 by an eruption of the Vesuvius volcano, February 6, 2013. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>A damaged statue is seen in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A damaged statue is seen in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

A damaged statue is seen in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Tourists visit a room containing the plaster casts of the remains of citizens of Pompeii in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. Pompeii is one of the world's most famous archaeological sites and Italy's top tourist attraction. Thermae Stabianae is the site's oldest bath and it re-opens for visitors on March 8. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

Tourists visit a room containing the plaster casts of the remains of citizens of Pompeii in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. Pompeii is one of the world's most famous archaeological sites and Italy's top tourist attraction. Thermae...more

Tourists visit a room containing the plaster casts of the remains of citizens of Pompeii in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. Pompeii is one of the world's most famous archaeological sites and Italy's top tourist attraction. Thermae Stabianae is the site's oldest bath and it re-opens for visitors on March 8. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>A portion of the Thermae Stabianae is seen in Pompeii March 8, 2012.  REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A portion of the Thermae Stabianae is seen in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

A portion of the Thermae Stabianae is seen in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Tourists visit the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012.  REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

Tourists visit the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

Tourists visit the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>A plaster cast of the the remains of a citizen of Pompeii is seen in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A plaster cast of the the remains of a citizen of Pompeii is seen in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

A plaster cast of the the remains of a citizen of Pompeii is seen in the Thermae Stabianae in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>A portion of the Thermae Stabianae is seen in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A portion of the Thermae Stabianae is seen in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

A portion of the Thermae Stabianae is seen in Pompeii March 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Workers harvest grapes in the Foro Boario vineyards of ancient Pompeii, October 20, 2011. Some 2,000 years after mount Vesuvius buried it in fire and ash, the ancient city of Pompeii started to harvest a red wine called "Villa dei Misteri" from its own vineyards. REUTERS/Agnfoto</p>

Workers harvest grapes in the Foro Boario vineyards of ancient Pompeii, October 20, 2011. Some 2,000 years after mount Vesuvius buried it in fire and ash, the ancient city of Pompeii started to harvest a red wine called "Villa dei Misteri" from its...more

Workers harvest grapes in the Foro Boario vineyards of ancient Pompeii, October 20, 2011. Some 2,000 years after mount Vesuvius buried it in fire and ash, the ancient city of Pompeii started to harvest a red wine called "Villa dei Misteri" from its own vineyards. REUTERS/Agnfoto

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<p>A long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist is seen after collapsing following heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. Another part of the 2,000 -year-old archaeological site at Pompeii collapsed on Tuesday just weeks after a similar incident, sparking more criticism of the government by critics who say two collapses this month underscore the need for urgent action to preserve the site.  REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist is seen after collapsing following heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. Another part of the 2,000 -year-old archaeological site at Pompeii collapsed on Tuesday...more

A long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist is seen after collapsing following heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. Another part of the 2,000 -year-old archaeological site at Pompeii collapsed on Tuesday just weeks after a similar incident, sparking more criticism of the government by critics who say two collapses this month underscore the need for urgent action to preserve the site. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>A tourist takes a picture of a statue in front of a long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist, which collapsed after heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010.   REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

A tourist takes a picture of a statue in front of a long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist, which collapsed after heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

A tourist takes a picture of a statue in front of a long section of a rustic retaining wall in the garden of the House of the Moralist, which collapsed after heavy rains in Pompeii November 30, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>People stand near debris after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

People stand near debris after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

People stand near debris after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Workers stand by debris after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. The 2,000-year-old "House of the Gladiators" in the ruins of ancient Pompeii collapsed on Saturday, officials said.  REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

Workers stand by debris after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. The 2,000-year-old "House of the Gladiators" in the ruins of ancient Pompeii collapsed on Saturday, officials said. ...more

Workers stand by debris after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. The 2,000-year-old "House of the Gladiators" in the ruins of ancient Pompeii collapsed on Saturday, officials said. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Workers carry equipment after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010.  REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

Workers carry equipment after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

Workers carry equipment after a house, once used by gladiators to train before combat, collapsed in Pompeii November 6, 2010. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius seen in the background, July 17, 2008. Nearly 2,000 years after it was buried under a volcanic eruption, the ancient Roman town of Pompeii is being steadily ruined by the modern world. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius seen in the background, July 17, 2008. Nearly 2,000 years after it was buried under a volcanic eruption, the ancient Roman town of...more

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius seen in the background, July 17, 2008. Nearly 2,000 years after it was buried under a volcanic eruption, the ancient Roman town of Pompeii is being steadily ruined by the modern world. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>Tourists protect themselves from the sun as they visit the ancient Roman city of Pompeii, destroyed by the Vesuvius volcanic eruption in 79 AD, August 24, 2007. Decades of neglect, millions of trampling visitors and the ravages of sunlight and rain are threatening to wipe out for good one of the world's most famous archaeological sites and Italy's top tourist attraction.    REUTERS/Tony Gentile</p>

Tourists protect themselves from the sun as they visit the ancient Roman city of Pompeii, destroyed by the Vesuvius volcanic eruption in 79 AD, August 24, 2007. Decades of neglect, millions of trampling visitors and the ravages of sunlight and rain...more

Tourists protect themselves from the sun as they visit the ancient Roman city of Pompeii, destroyed by the Vesuvius volcanic eruption in 79 AD, August 24, 2007. Decades of neglect, millions of trampling visitors and the ravages of sunlight and rain are threatening to wipe out for good one of the world's most famous archaeological sites and Italy's top tourist attraction. REUTERS/Tony Gentile

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<p>Visitors watch a mummy through a perimeter fence in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. Archaeologists and art historians have long complained about the poor upkeep of the Pompeii treasures, warning that its fading frescoes, leaky roofs and crumbling walls would not survive the test of time.  REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

Visitors watch a mummy through a perimeter fence in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. Archaeologists and art historians have long complained about the poor upkeep of...more

Visitors watch a mummy through a perimeter fence in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. Archaeologists and art historians have long complained about the poor upkeep of the Pompeii treasures, warning that its fading frescoes, leaky roofs and crumbling walls would not survive the test of time. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>A visitor walks in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

A visitor walks in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

A visitor walks in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>A man dressed as a Roman legionnaire walks past images of Roman gods, uncovered at Pompeii which was destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, at the Melbourne Museum June 25, 2009.    REUTERS/Mick Tsikas</p>

A man dressed as a Roman legionnaire walks past images of Roman gods, uncovered at Pompeii which was destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, at the Melbourne Museum June 25, 2009. REUTERS/Mick Tsikas

A man dressed as a Roman legionnaire walks past images of Roman gods, uncovered at Pompeii which was destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, at the Melbourne Museum June 25, 2009. REUTERS/Mick Tsikas

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<p>A curator poses with a 2,000-year-old gladiator helmet from Pompeii as a preview for an exhibition at the Melbourne Museum June 4, 2009. The bronze helmet survived the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and was worn by a heavily armoured gladiator called a "murmillo".  REUTERS/Mick Tsikas</p>

A curator poses with a 2,000-year-old gladiator helmet from Pompeii as a preview for an exhibition at the Melbourne Museum June 4, 2009. The bronze helmet survived the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and was worn by a heavily armoured gladiator called a...more

A curator poses with a 2,000-year-old gladiator helmet from Pompeii as a preview for an exhibition at the Melbourne Museum June 4, 2009. The bronze helmet survived the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and was worn by a heavily armoured gladiator called a "murmillo". REUTERS/Mick Tsikas

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<p>The "The Three Graces", a piece of a fresco taken from the home of a noble Roman in Pompeii, is one of the 100 paintings from an exhibition in Rome called "The Paintings of an Empire" September 24, 2009. The exhibition gathers Roman-era wall paintings from museums around the world to show how the rich Romans decorated their homes 2,000 years ago.     REUTERS/Palaexpo Exhibition Organization/Handout</p>

The "The Three Graces", a piece of a fresco taken from the home of a noble Roman in Pompeii, is one of the 100 paintings from an exhibition in Rome called "The Paintings of an Empire" September 24, 2009. The exhibition gathers Roman-era wall...more

The "The Three Graces", a piece of a fresco taken from the home of a noble Roman in Pompeii, is one of the 100 paintings from an exhibition in Rome called "The Paintings of an Empire" September 24, 2009. The exhibition gathers Roman-era wall paintings from museums around the world to show how the rich Romans decorated their homes 2,000 years ago. REUTERS/Palaexpo Exhibition Organization/Handout

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<p>Plaster casts of victims of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii in 79 AD, are displayed at the Melbourne Museum June 25, 2009. 
 REUTERS/Mick Tsikas</p>

Plaster casts of victims of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii in 79 AD, are displayed at the Melbourne Museum June 25, 2009. REUTERS/Mick Tsikas

Plaster casts of victims of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii in 79 AD, are displayed at the Melbourne Museum June 25, 2009. REUTERS/Mick Tsikas

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<p>Visitors look at a mummy in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008.  REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

Visitors look at a mummy in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

Visitors look at a mummy in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples, which is destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in this file photo taken October 13, 2007. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca</p>

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples, which is destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in this file photo taken October 13, 2007. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples, which is destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in this file photo taken October 13, 2007. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca

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<p>Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>Excavations of Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, are seen, July 17, 2008.    REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

Excavations of Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, are seen, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

Excavations of Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, are seen, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>Visitors checks a plan of the excavations of Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, as a dog sleeps on the ground, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

Visitors checks a plan of the excavations of Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, as a dog sleeps on the ground, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

Visitors checks a plan of the excavations of Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, as a dog sleeps on the ground, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

Visitors walk in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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<p>A dog lies on the ground in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito</p>

A dog lies on the ground in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

A dog lies on the ground in Pompeii, the famous city next to Naples which was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius July 17, 2008. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito

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