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Pictures | Mon Oct 22, 2012 | 5:02pm EDT

"Sickened" UCI strips Armstrong of Tour wins

Seven-time Tour de France winner Team Radioshack rider Lance Armstrong waits at the starting line in Visalia, California of stage five of the Amgen Tour of California in a May 20, 2010 file photo. Sunglasses maker Oakley has become the latest sponsor to drop Armstrong over a doping scandal that has seen him stripped of his seven Tour de France titles. REUTERS/Anthony Bolante/files

Seven-time Tour de France winner Team Radioshack rider Lance Armstrong waits at the starting line in Visalia, California of stage five of the Amgen Tour of California in a May 20, 2010 file photo. Sunglasses maker Oakley has become the latest sponsor...more

Seven-time Tour de France winner Team Radioshack rider Lance Armstrong waits at the starting line in Visalia, California of stage five of the Amgen Tour of California in a May 20, 2010 file photo. Sunglasses maker Oakley has become the latest sponsor to drop Armstrong over a doping scandal that has seen him stripped of his seven Tour de France titles. REUTERS/Anthony Bolante/files
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Lance Armstrong makes an appearance at the LIVESTRONG's 15th anniversary gala, his cancer-fighting charity in Austin, Texas, October 19, 2012 released to Reuters on October 22, 2012. REUTERS/Elizabeth Kreutz/Lance Armstrong Foundation/Handout

Lance Armstrong makes an appearance at the LIVESTRONG's 15th anniversary gala, his cancer-fighting charity in Austin, Texas, October 19, 2012 released to Reuters on October 22, 2012. REUTERS/Elizabeth Kreutz/Lance Armstrong Foundation/Handout

Lance Armstrong makes an appearance at the LIVESTRONG's 15th anniversary gala, his cancer-fighting charity in Austin, Texas, October 19, 2012 released to Reuters on October 22, 2012. REUTERS/Elizabeth Kreutz/Lance Armstrong Foundation/Handout
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Then US Postal team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. waits in front of the pack of riders for the start of the 192.5km first stage of the 89th Tour de France cycling race in Luxembourg in this July 7, 2002 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the International Cycling Union (UCI) said on October 22, 2012 it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard/Files

Then US Postal team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. waits in front of the pack of riders for the start of the 192.5km first stage of the 89th Tour de France cycling race in Luxembourg in this July 7, 2002 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of...more

Then US Postal team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. waits in front of the pack of riders for the start of the 192.5km first stage of the 89th Tour de France cycling race in Luxembourg in this July 7, 2002 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the International Cycling Union (UCI) said on October 22, 2012 it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard/Files
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Then Astana rider Lance Armstrong (C) of the U.S. cycles during the third stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race between Marseille and La Grande-Motte in this July 6, 2009 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the International Cycling Union (UCI) said on October 22, 2012 it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel/Files

Then Astana rider Lance Armstrong (C) of the U.S. cycles during the third stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race between Marseille and La Grande-Motte in this July 6, 2009 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France...more

Then Astana rider Lance Armstrong (C) of the U.S. cycles during the third stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race between Marseille and La Grande-Motte in this July 6, 2009 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the International Cycling Union (UCI) said on October 22, 2012 it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel/Files
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International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid arrives for a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the UCI said on Monday it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. On October 10, USADA published a report into Armstrong which alleged the now retired American rider had been involved in the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen". Armstrong, 41, had previously elected not to contest USADA charges, prompting USADA to propose his punishment pending confirmation from cycling's world governing body. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid arrives for a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the...more

International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid arrives for a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the UCI said on Monday it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. On October 10, USADA published a report into Armstrong which alleged the now retired American rider had been involved in the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen". Armstrong, 41, had previously elected not to contest USADA charges, prompting USADA to propose his punishment pending confirmation from cycling's world governing body. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
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Then overall leader and five-time Tour de France winner US Postal rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. cycles down a mountain during the 204.5 km long 17th stage of the Tour de France from Bourg-d'Oisans to Le Grand Bornand, in this July 22, 2004 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the International Cycling Union (UCI) said on October 22, 2012 it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini/Files

Then overall leader and five-time Tour de France winner US Postal rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. cycles down a mountain during the 204.5 km long 17th stage of the Tour de France from Bourg-d'Oisans to Le Grand Bornand, in this July 22, 2004 file...more

Then overall leader and five-time Tour de France winner US Postal rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. cycles down a mountain during the 204.5 km long 17th stage of the Tour de France from Bourg-d'Oisans to Le Grand Bornand, in this July 22, 2004 file photo. Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the International Cycling Union (UCI) said on October 22, 2012 it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini/Files
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International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid arrives for a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the UCI said on Monday it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. On October 10, USADA published a report into Armstrong which alleged the now retired American rider had been involved in the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen". Armstrong, 41, had previously elected not to contest USADA charges, prompting USADA to propose his punishment pending confirmation from cycling's world governing body. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid arrives for a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the...more

International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid arrives for a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the UCI said on Monday it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. On October 10, USADA published a report into Armstrong which alleged the now retired American rider had been involved in the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen". Armstrong, 41, had previously elected not to contest USADA charges, prompting USADA to propose his punishment pending confirmation from cycling's world governing body. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
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Lance Armstrong walks back to his car after running at Mount Royal park with fans in Montreal August 29, 2012. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi

Lance Armstrong walks back to his car after running at Mount Royal park with fans in Montreal August 29, 2012. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi

Lance Armstrong walks back to his car after running at Mount Royal park with fans in Montreal August 29, 2012. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi
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International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid (C) speaks to media during a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the UCI said on Monday it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. On October 10, USADA published a report into Armstrong which alleged the now retired American rider had been involved in the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen". Armstrong, 41, had previously elected not to contest USADA charges, prompting USADA to propose his punishment pending confirmation from cycling's world governing body. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid (C) speaks to media during a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for...more

International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid (C) speaks to media during a news conference on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in Geneva October 22, 2012. Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after the UCI said on Monday it had ratified the United States Anti-Doping Agency's (USADA) sanctions. On October 10, USADA published a report into Armstrong which alleged the now retired American rider had been involved in the "most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen". Armstrong, 41, had previously elected not to contest USADA charges, prompting USADA to propose his punishment pending confirmation from cycling's world governing body. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
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