Edition:
United States
Pictures | Tue Nov 20, 2012 | 1:23am EST

Special Report: In South Sudan, plunder preserves a fragile peace

The city of Juba is seen at sunset, in this October 4, 2012 file photograph. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian/Files

The city of Juba is seen at sunset, in this October 4, 2012 file photograph. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian/Files

The city of Juba is seen at sunset, in this October 4, 2012 file photograph. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian/Files
Close
1 / 26
People pass close to a road construction project in Juba, South Sudan, May 21, 2012. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

People pass close to a road construction project in Juba, South Sudan, May 21, 2012. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

People pass close to a road construction project in Juba, South Sudan, May 21, 2012. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
2 / 26
Statues are seen on display in the office of Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Statues are seen on display in the office of Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Statues are seen on display in the office of Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
3 / 26
A map is seen in the office of Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A map is seen in the office of Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A map is seen in the office of Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
4 / 26
South Sudanese President Salva Kiir arrives at Khartoum Airport in this October 8, 2011 file photograph. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Files

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir arrives at Khartoum Airport in this October 8, 2011 file photograph. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Files

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir arrives at Khartoum Airport in this October 8, 2011 file photograph. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Files
Close
5 / 26
South Sudan's emblem is seen on a gate at the Ministries Compound in Juba, October 17, 2012. Picture taken October 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's emblem is seen on a gate at the Ministries Compound in Juba, October 17, 2012. Picture taken October 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's emblem is seen on a gate at the Ministries Compound in Juba, October 17, 2012. Picture taken October 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
6 / 26
Deng Athuai Mawiir, Chairperson of the South Sudan Civil Society Alliance, poses for a photograph in Juba, November 6, 2012. Picture taken November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Deng Athuai Mawiir, Chairperson of the South Sudan Civil Society Alliance, poses for a photograph in Juba, November 6, 2012. Picture taken November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Deng Athuai Mawiir, Chairperson of the South Sudan Civil Society Alliance, poses for a photograph in Juba, November 6, 2012. Picture taken November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
7 / 26
South Sudan's Deputy Defence Minister Majak D'Agoot poses for a photograph at his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's Deputy Defence Minister Majak D'Agoot poses for a photograph at his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's Deputy Defence Minister Majak D'Agoot poses for a photograph at his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
8 / 26
Portraits of the late former rebel Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) leader John Garang (L) and South Sudan's President Salva Kiir (R) are seen on a wall in the reception area of South Sudan's Auditor General's office in Juba, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Portraits of the late former rebel Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) leader John Garang (L) and South Sudan's President Salva Kiir (R) are seen on a wall in the reception area of South Sudan's Auditor General's office in Juba, October 15,...more

Portraits of the late former rebel Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) leader John Garang (L) and South Sudan's President Salva Kiir (R) are seen on a wall in the reception area of South Sudan's Auditor General's office in Juba, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
9 / 26
Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, works in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, works in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, works in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
10 / 26
A sign is seen on the desk of South Sudan's Auditor General Stephen Wondu in his office in Juba, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A sign is seen on the desk of South Sudan's Auditor General Stephen Wondu in his office in Juba, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A sign is seen on the desk of South Sudan's Auditor General Stephen Wondu in his office in Juba, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
11 / 26
Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, works in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, works in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Jok Madut Jok, South Sudan's Undersecretary of Culture, works in his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
12 / 26
South Sudan's Deputy Defence Minister Majak D'Agoot poses for a photograph at his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's Deputy Defence Minister Majak D'Agoot poses for a photograph at his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's Deputy Defence Minister Majak D'Agoot poses for a photograph at his office in Juba, October 16, 2012. Picture taken October 16, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
13 / 26
Notes are seen in the office of Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Notes are seen in the office of Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Notes are seen in the office of Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
14 / 26
Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, is seen at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/GOVERNORS REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, is seen at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/GOVERNORS REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, is seen at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/GOVERNORS REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
15 / 26
South Sudan's Auditor General Stephen Wondu poses for a photograph in his office in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/GOVERNORS REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's Auditor General Stephen Wondu poses for a photograph in his office in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/GOVERNORS REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

South Sudan's Auditor General Stephen Wondu poses for a photograph in his office in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. To match Special Report SOUTH-SUDAN/GOVERNORS REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
16 / 26
Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, points to a map at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, points to a map at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Simon Mijok, South Sudan's Deputy Minister of Roads and Bridges, points to a map at his office in Juba, May 17, 2012. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
17 / 26
A government vehicle is parked outside of the Ministry of Labour, Public Service and Human Resource Development in Juba, South Sudan, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A government vehicle is parked outside of the Ministry of Labour, Public Service and Human Resource Development in Juba, South Sudan, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A government vehicle is parked outside of the Ministry of Labour, Public Service and Human Resource Development in Juba, South Sudan, October 15, 2012. Picture taken October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
18 / 26
Children walk past a road construction project in Juba, May 21, 2012. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Children walk past a road construction project in Juba, May 21, 2012. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Children walk past a road construction project in Juba, May 21, 2012. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
19 / 26
A man washes a government car outside of the Ministry of Petroleum and Mining in Juba, November 7, 2012. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A man washes a government car outside of the Ministry of Petroleum and Mining in Juba, November 7, 2012. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A man washes a government car outside of the Ministry of Petroleum and Mining in Juba, November 7, 2012. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
20 / 26
Dwanya James (C) teaches mathematics at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Dwanya James (C) teaches mathematics at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Dwanya James (C) teaches mathematics at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
21 / 26
A bodyguard stands outside the office of South Sudan's Minister of Petroleum and Mining, Stephen Dhieu Dau in Juba, November 3, 2012. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A bodyguard stands outside the office of South Sudan's Minister of Petroleum and Mining, Stephen Dhieu Dau in Juba, November 3, 2012. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A bodyguard stands outside the office of South Sudan's Minister of Petroleum and Mining, Stephen Dhieu Dau in Juba, November 3, 2012. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
22 / 26
Dwanya James teaches mathematics at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Dwanya James teaches mathematics at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Dwanya James teaches mathematics at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
23 / 26
Drawings hang on the wall of a classroom at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Drawings hang on the wall of a classroom at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

Drawings hang on the wall of a classroom at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
24 / 26
The staff office, built in 1948, is seen at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

The staff office, built in 1948, is seen at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

The staff office, built in 1948, is seen at the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
25 / 26
A photograph of South Sudan's President Salva Kiir is seen on the wall of the office of the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A photograph of South Sudan's President Salva Kiir is seen on the wall of the office of the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian

A photograph of South Sudan's President Salva Kiir is seen on the wall of the office of the Juba One Girls Basic Education School in Juba, November 1, 2012. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Adriane Ohanesian
Close
26 / 26

Next Slideshows

Insight: Sri Lanka's "people's dynasty" - help or harm for growth?

JAFFNA, Sri Lanka (Reuters) - From foreign hotel towers sprouting on Colombo's seafront to the new motorbikes and mobile phones buzzing in war-ravaged Jaffna,...

Nov 18 2012

Insight: Facing austerity, Europe's bureaucrats chafe

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Workers protesting austerity on the streets of southern Europe weren't to know it, but earlier this month there was also a strike at the...

Nov 18 2012

Insight: Lockheed's F-35 logistics system revolutionary but risky

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - When computer "hackers" working for the U.S. Navy succeeded in breaking into the computer logistics system that controls the Lockheed...

Nov 16 2012

Special Report: Myanmar military's next campaign: shoring up power

NAYPYITAW (Reuters) - Aung Thaw was a teenager when he joined Myanmar's armed forces, which seized power in 1962 and led a promising Asian nation into half a...

Nov 15 2012

MORE IN PICTURES

What Islamic State left behind

What Islamic State left behind

Sifting through the rubble of Islamic State's abandoned strongholds.

Iraqi forces complete takeover of Kirkuk

Iraqi forces complete takeover of Kirkuk

Iraqi forces take control of the last district in the oil-rich province of Kirkuk still in the hands of Kurdish Peshmerga.

Battle for besieged Philippine city nears end

Battle for besieged Philippine city nears end

Some of the 200,000 residents of Marawi, driven from their homes during 150 days of battle between the Philippine military and pro-Islamic State rebels, return to start a long cleanup of their devastated city.

Puerto Rico after Maria

Puerto Rico after Maria

Residents of Puerto Rico start to rebuild after Hurricane Maria devastated the island.

Road to the World Series

Road to the World Series

Highlights from the MLB playoffs.

Today in Sports

Today in Sports

Our top sports photography of the day.

One month after Mexico's earthquake

One month after Mexico's earthquake

Residents grapple with the aftermath of last month's quake in Mexico City that killed over 300 people.

Photos of the week

Photos of the week

Our top photos from the past week.

Richard Spencer speaks on Florida campus

Richard Spencer speaks on Florida campus

Protesters chanting "Go home Nazis" sought to drown out the speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer at the University of Florida, as the campus erected barricades and deployed hundreds of police officers to guard against unrest.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast