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Sudan shopping mall fights the odds post-secession

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MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH

A view shows Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and Puma set up shop in Khartoum, a rundown city that had seen little...more

A view shows Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and Puma set up shop in Khartoum, a rundown city that had seen little development since independence from Britain in 1956. REUTERS/ Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
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Photographer
MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH

A view shows the main entrance of Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and Puma set up shop in Khartoum, a rundown city that had...more

A view shows the main entrance of Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and Puma set up shop in Khartoum, a rundown city that had seen little development since independence from Britain in 1956. REUTERS/ Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
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Photographer
MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH

Kamal el-Din, the manager of a Chinese furniture shop, displays furniture for sale at Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and...more

Kamal el-Din, the manager of a Chinese furniture shop, displays furniture for sale at Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and Puma set up shop in Khartoum, a rundown city that had seen little development since independence from Britain in 1956. REUTERS/ Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
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Photographer
MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH

An employee stands near furniture for sale at a Chinese furniture shop at Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and Puma set up...more

An employee stands near furniture for sale at a Chinese furniture shop at Khartoum's new al-Waha mall December 2, 2012. Ambitious plans backed by Gulf Arab investors were drawn up when the economy started to accelerate, driven by petro-dollars, after the government signed a peace deal with southern rebels in 2005. New hotels such as the Saudi-built Rotana and expensive stores such as German sports retailers Adidas and Puma set up shop in Khartoum, a rundown city that had seen little development since independence from Britain in 1956. REUTERS/ Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
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