Edition:
United States
Pictures | Mon Nov 26, 2012 | 6:23pm EST

Sun, sand and root canal: Medical tourism booms in Costa Rica

Two dentists work on a U.S. patient at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

Two dentists work on a U.S. patient at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the...more

Two dentists work on a U.S. patient at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
1 / 10
A dentist extracts a tooth from Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dentist extracts a tooth from Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dentist extracts a tooth from Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
2 / 10
A dentist shows a radiograph of a mouth belonging to a U.S. patient, at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dentist shows a radiograph of a mouth belonging to a U.S. patient, at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are...more

A dentist shows a radiograph of a mouth belonging to a U.S. patient, at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
3 / 10
A dentist places a dental implant for Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla near San Jose November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dentist places a dental implant for Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla near San Jose November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009....more

A dentist places a dental implant for Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla near San Jose November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
4 / 10
A dental mold is pictured in front of Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dental mold is pictured in front of Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dental mold is pictured in front of Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
5 / 10
Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, leaves a dental clinic after receiving treatment in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, leaves a dental clinic after receiving treatment in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009....more

Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, leaves a dental clinic after receiving treatment in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
6 / 10
A dentist checks the teeth of a U.S. patient, at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dentist checks the teeth of a U.S. patient, at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian,...more

A dentist checks the teeth of a U.S. patient, at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
7 / 10
A dentist works on a U.S. patient at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dentist works on a U.S. patient at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the...more

A dentist works on a U.S. patient at a dental clinic in San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
8 / 10
Dentist prepare Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

Dentist prepare Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

Dentist prepare Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla, near San Jose November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
9 / 10
A dentist removes the denture mold of Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla near San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate

A dentist removes the denture mold of Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla near San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009....more

A dentist removes the denture mold of Marlene Trithardt, a Canadian patient, at a dental clinic in Sabanilla near San Jose, November 1, 2012. Around 40,000 medical tourists visited Costa Rica last year, compared to 36,000 in 2010 and 30,000 in 2009. Most of them are American and Canadian, according to the country's tourism institute, ICT. Of that number, almost 15,000 of them traveled for dental care, said Massimo Manzi, director at Promed, the council for international promotion of medicine in Costa Rica. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Close
10 / 10

Next Slideshows

Doctors should consider hepatitis C testing: panel

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A government-backed panel advises doctors to "consider offering screening" for hepatitis C to adults born between 1945 and 1965, in...

Nov 26 2012

Obama health law to face religion-based challenge

(Reuters) - The Supreme Court on Monday cleared the way for a Christian college to pursue a religion-based challenge against part of President Barack Obama's...

Nov 26 2012

Medicaid expansion poses "modest" state costs: study

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama's $1 trillion plan to expand Medicaid would raise state costs by only 3 percent and extend health coverage to more...

Nov 26 2012

Traffic pollution tied to autism risk: study

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Babies who are exposed to lots of traffic-related air pollution in the womb and during their first year of life are more likely to...

Nov 26 2012

MORE IN PICTURES

Trump visits Arizona

Trump visits Arizona

President Donald Trump tours a Customs and Border Protection facility, meets with Marines, and is set to hold a campaign rally in Arizona.

White House after renovations

White House after renovations

A glimpse inside the White House before and after renovations.

Eclipse over America

Eclipse over America

Millions gather to watch the first total solar eclipse to unfold from coast to coast in the continental U.S. in nearly a century.

Earthquake strikes Italian resort island

Earthquake strikes Italian resort island

An earthquake hits the tourist-packed holiday island of Ischia off the coast of Naples.

U.S. Navy ship collides with oil tanker

U.S. Navy ship collides with oil tanker

Ten sailors are missing after the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain collided with an oil tanker east of Singapore.

Ripple effects of Charlottesville

Ripple effects of Charlottesville

Americans respond to the violence in Virginia, vandalizing, toppling or protesting against Confederate monuments, vandalizing a Holocaust memorial and spray-painting the Lincoln Memorial with obscene graffiti.

Remembering Princess Diana

Remembering Princess Diana

A look back at the life of Princess Diana on the 20th anniversary of her untimely death.

Iraqi forces surround Islamic State

Iraqi forces surround Islamic State

Iraqi forces launch an offensive to oust Islamic State from the city of Tal Afar.

White House watches eclipse

White House watches eclipse

President Trump watches the eclipse from the White House.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast