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Pictures | Wed Mar 27, 2013 | 7:00pm EDT

Supreme Court indicates it may strike down marriage law

Protestors Ellena Popova (C) and Seosamh Hackett blow bubbles as they rally against the Defense of Marriage Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Protestors Ellena Popova (C) and Seosamh Hackett blow bubbles as they rally against the Defense of Marriage Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Protestors Ellena Popova (C) and Seosamh Hackett blow bubbles as they rally against the Defense of Marriage Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Protestors hold signs and flags as they rally against the Defense of Marriage Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Protestors hold signs and flags as they rally against the Defense of Marriage Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Protestors hold signs and flags as they rally against the Defense of Marriage Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, walks after arguments outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, walks after arguments outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, walks after arguments outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Attorney Paul Clement (R) argues in front of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts (L) and Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy about the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in Washington, in this courtroom drawing released on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Art Lien/Handout

Attorney Paul Clement (R) argues in front of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts (L) and Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy about the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in Washington, in this courtroom drawing released...more

Attorney Paul Clement (R) argues in front of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts (L) and Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy about the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in Washington, in this courtroom drawing released on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Art Lien/Handout
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Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, speaks to the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, speaks to the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, speaks to the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, celebrates after arguments outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, celebrates after arguments outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act, celebrates after arguments outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Supporters of gay marriage hold rainbow-colored flags as they rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Supporters of gay marriage hold rainbow-colored flags as they rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Supporters of gay marriage hold rainbow-colored flags as they rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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A supporter of gay marriage holds a sign in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

A supporter of gay marriage holds a sign in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

A supporter of gay marriage holds a sign in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Supporters of gay marriage rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Supporters of gay marriage rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Supporters of gay marriage rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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A supporter (C) of traditional marriage rallies in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

A supporter (C) of traditional marriage rallies in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

A supporter (C) of traditional marriage rallies in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Supporters of gay marriage hand out flags as they rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Supporters of gay marriage hand out flags as they rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Supporters of gay marriage hand out flags as they rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Elodie Huttner (2nd L) holds a flag to protest against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) as she waits in line in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Elodie Huttner (2nd L) holds a flag to protest against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) as she waits in line in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Elodie Huttner (2nd L) holds a flag to protest against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) as she waits in line in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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People wait in line, in the hopes of being seated, to hear the arguments in the case against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

People wait in line, in the hopes of being seated, to hear the arguments in the case against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

People wait in line, in the hopes of being seated, to hear the arguments in the case against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Diana Iwanski of Clermont, Florida, holds a sign to protest against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Diana Iwanski of Clermont, Florida, holds a sign to protest against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Diana Iwanski of Clermont, Florida, holds a sign to protest against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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United for Marriage volunteer Marcos Garcia holds flags as he protests against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

United for Marriage volunteer Marcos Garcia holds flags as he protests against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

United for Marriage volunteer Marcos Garcia holds flags as he protests against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Alan Eckert (C) of Albany, California, is photographed with his sign as he protests against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Alan Eckert (C) of Albany, California, is photographed with his sign as he protests against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Alan Eckert (C) of Albany, California, is photographed with his sign as he protests against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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People wait in line outside the Supreme Court that shall be hearing the arguments challenging the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court that shall be hearing the arguments challenging the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court that shall be hearing the arguments challenging the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Edie Windsor (center L), plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), arrives at the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor (center L), plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), arrives at the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor (center L), plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), arrives at the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Edie Windsor (L), plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), arrives with her attorney Roberta Kaplan at the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor (L), plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), arrives with her attorney Roberta Kaplan at the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Edie Windsor (L), plaintiff in the hearing against the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), arrives with her attorney Roberta Kaplan at the Supreme Court in Washington March 27, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Mar 27 2013

Senators back gay marriage as Supreme Court hears cases

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