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U.S. anti-cocaine push embitters Peru chocolate makers

Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

Native cocoa beans (top) and beans from the CCN-51 cocoa hybrid are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. Connoisseurs who take chocolate as seriously as sommeliers study wine are challenging the widespread use of an inferior cocoa, the high-yielding but acidic tasting CCN-51 cocoa hybrid, pushed by the U.S. government in its war against drugs in Peru, considered by many to be the birthplace...more

Native cocoa beans (top) and beans from the CCN-51 cocoa hybrid are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. Connoisseurs who take chocolate as seriously as sommeliers study wine are challenging the widespread use of an inferior cocoa, the high-yielding but acidic tasting CCN-51 cocoa hybrid, pushed by the U.S. government in its war against drugs in Peru, considered by many to be the birthplace of cocoa. Picture taken March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

A just-opened native cocoa fruit is shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

A just-opened native cocoa fruit is shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

A worker shows grounded dried cocoa beans to the photographer at the Di Perugia cocoa factory in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

A worker shows grounded dried cocoa beans to the photographer at the Di Perugia cocoa factory in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

A worker displays liquid chocolate at the Di Perugia cocoa factory in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

A worker displays liquid chocolate at the Di Perugia cocoa factory in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

Chocolate maker Mariella Balbi works at her Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 2, 2012. Connoisseurs who take chocolate as seriously as sommeliers study wine are challenging the widespread use of an inferior cocoa, the high-yielding but acidic tasting CCN-51 cocoa hybrid, pushed by the U.S. government in its war against drugs in Peru, considered by many to be the birthplace of cocoa. Picture taken March 2, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar...more

Chocolate maker Mariella Balbi works at her Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 2, 2012. Connoisseurs who take chocolate as seriously as sommeliers study wine are challenging the widespread use of an inferior cocoa, the high-yielding but acidic tasting CCN-51 cocoa hybrid, pushed by the U.S. government in its war against drugs in Peru, considered by many to be the birthplace of cocoa. Picture taken March 2, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

Native cocoa fruits are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Native cocoa fruits are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

Dried cocoa beans of the native variety are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 2, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Dried cocoa beans of the native variety are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 2, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

An opened native cocoa fruit is shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

An opened native cocoa fruit is shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

Native cocoa beans (L) and beans from the CCN-51 cocoa hybrid are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Native cocoa beans (L) and beans from the CCN-51 cocoa hybrid are shown to the photographer at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

A worker removes dried cocoa beans at the Di Perugia cocoa factory in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

A worker removes dried cocoa beans at the Di Perugia cocoa factory in Lima March 9, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

Chocolates are displayed at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 2, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Chocolates are displayed at the Guanni Chocolates shop in Lima March 2, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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Photographer
PILAR OLIVARES

Pastry chef Astrid Gutsche speaks during an interview with Reuters at her business in Lima March 6, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares

Pastry chef Astrid Gutsche speaks during an interview with Reuters at her business in Lima March 6, 2012. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
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