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U.S. pressures BP over oil spill as Obama visits Gulf

Members of the Tri State Bird Rescue and Research team in Fort Jackson treat a Northern Gannet which was found on Friday in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, May 1, 2010. Oil has been gushing unchecked from a ruptured deepwater well off Louisiana, pouring into the Gulf of Mexico at a rate of up to 5,000 barrels (210,000 gallons or 955,000 litres) a day since last week, and so far efforts plug the leaks have failed. Picture...more

Members of the Tri State Bird Rescue and Research team in Fort Jackson treat a Northern Gannet which was found on Friday in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, May 1, 2010. Oil has been gushing unchecked from a ruptured deepwater well off Louisiana, pouring into the Gulf of Mexico at a rate of up to 5,000 barrels (210,000 gallons or 955,000 litres) a day since last week, and so far efforts plug the leaks have failed. Picture taken May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

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U.S. President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

U.S. President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

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Rob Canty from Slidell, Louisiana works on his shrimp boat in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Mitchell

Rob Canty from Slidell, Louisiana works on his shrimp boat in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Mitchell

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Jacob Terrebone (L) from Houma, Louisiana helps Niki Lincoln load shrimp that they caught outside Houma into her truck in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Mitchell

Jacob Terrebone (L) from Houma, Louisiana helps Niki Lincoln load shrimp that they caught outside Houma into her truck in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Mitchell

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Rob Canty (L) and Ray LaBry from Slidell, Louisiana work on their shrimp boat in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Mitchell

Rob Canty (L) and Ray LaBry from Slidell, Louisiana work on their shrimp boat in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Joe Mitchell

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A satellite image of an oil slick off the Louisiana coast, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

A satellite image of an oil slick off the Louisiana coast, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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Oil booms are seen as they reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Oil booms are seen as they reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Birds sit on the water surrounded by oil booms on Breton Sound Island, on the southern most tip of the Chandeluer Islands in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace

Birds sit on the water surrounded by oil booms on Breton Sound Island, on the southern most tip of the Chandeluer Islands in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace

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Twisted oil booms are seen as strong winds and waves reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Twisted oil booms are seen as strong winds and waves reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Oil booms are seen as they reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Oil booms are seen as they reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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U.S. President Barack Obama departs the Oval Office to the Marine One helicopter en route to Michigan from the White House in Washington, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. President Barack Obama departs the Oval Office to the Marine One helicopter en route to Michigan from the White House in Washington, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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A Northern Gannet bird is covered in oil, from a massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico, at a Clean Gulf Associates Mobile Wildlife Rehabilitation station in Fort Jackson, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A Northern Gannet bird is covered in oil, from a massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico, at a Clean Gulf Associates Mobile Wildlife Rehabilitation station in Fort Jackson, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Birds fly over oil on the water near Breton Sound Island, on the southern most tip of the Chandeleur Islands in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace

Birds fly over oil on the water near Breton Sound Island, on the southern most tip of the Chandeleur Islands in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace

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Birds fly over the Gulf of Mexico where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread south of Venice, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Birds fly over the Gulf of Mexico where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread south of Venice, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Birds fly over the Gulf of Mexico where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread south of Venice, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Birds fly over the Gulf of Mexico where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread south of Venice, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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A Northern Gannet bird is covered in oil, from a massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico, at a Clean Gulf Associates Mobile Wildlife Rehabilitation station in Fort Jackson, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A Northern Gannet bird is covered in oil, from a massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico, at a Clean Gulf Associates Mobile Wildlife Rehabilitation station in Fort Jackson, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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A shrimp boat sails in the Gulf of Mexico where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread south of Venice, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A shrimp boat sails in the Gulf of Mexico where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread south of Venice, Louisiana April 30, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Oil booms protect a small island along Port East in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

Oil booms protect a small island along Port East in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

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Birds fly over a band of oil in this view of the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

Birds fly over a band of oil in this view of the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

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An oil slick (outlined in white) off the Louisiana coast, in a satellite image, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

An oil slick (outlined in white) off the Louisiana coast, in a satellite image, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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Birds flock on Breton Sound Island on the southernmost tip of the Chandeleur Islands in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

Birds flock on Breton Sound Island on the southernmost tip of the Chandeleur Islands in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana, April 29, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

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A U.S. Coast Guard cutter during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

A U.S. Coast Guard cutter during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

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A satellite image shows clean up vessels near the oil slick resulting from the explosion of the Transocean Deepwater Horizon oil rig, in the Gulf of Mexico, April 26, 2010. REUTERS/DigitalGlobe/Handout

A satellite image shows clean up vessels near the oil slick resulting from the explosion of the Transocean Deepwater Horizon oil rig, in the Gulf of Mexico, April 26, 2010. REUTERS/DigitalGlobe/Handout

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A satellite image shows clean up vessels near the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico, April 26, 2010. REUTERS/DigitalGlobe/Handout

A satellite image shows clean up vessels near the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico, April 26, 2010. REUTERS/DigitalGlobe/Handout

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A U.S. Coast Guard cutter during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

A U.S. Coast Guard cutter during cleanup activity in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

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A set of ships work to contain some of the oil on the surface in this view of the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

A set of ships work to contain some of the oil on the surface in this view of the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, April 28, 2010. REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout

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Response boats work to clean up oil off Louisiana, April 22, 2010. REUTERS/U.S. Coast Guard/Handout

Response boats work to clean up oil off Louisiana, April 22, 2010. REUTERS/U.S. Coast Guard/Handout

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A deepwater drilling platform is seen as oil booms reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

A deepwater drilling platform is seen as oil booms reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Birds sit surrounded by oil booms in South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread, May1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Birds sit surrounded by oil booms in South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread, May1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Oil booms are seen washed ashore on the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Oil booms are seen washed ashore on the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Twisted oil booms are seen as strong winds and waves reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Twisted oil booms are seen as strong winds and waves reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Twisted oil booms are seen as strong winds and waves reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Twisted oil booms are seen as strong winds and waves reach the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Oil booms are seen near the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Oil booms are seen near the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Birds fly as oil booms are seen reaching the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010.REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Birds fly as oil booms are seen reaching the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010.REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Oil booms are seen near the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Oil booms are seen near the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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Oil booms are seen near the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010.REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Oil booms are seen near the coast of South Pass, south of Venice, Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread in the Gulf of Mexico, May 1, 2010.REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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President Barack Obama talks with local fishermen after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

President Barack Obama talks with local fishermen after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

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President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

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President Barack Obama salutes first responders while touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig, in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

President Barack Obama salutes first responders while touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig, in Venice, Louisiana May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

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President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region, to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region, to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

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U.S. President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

U.S. President Barack Obama talks after touring the Coast Guard Venice Center in the Gulf of Mexico region to view environmental damage caused by the sinking of BP's oil and gas Deepwater Horizontal drilling rig while in Venice, Louisiana, May 2, 2010. REUTERS/Larry Downing

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