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Pictures | Fri Feb 1, 2013 | 2:37pm EST

Water, wine to lubricate Russian talks with war foe Georgia

Employees work at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Employees work at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia...more

Employees work at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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Bottled mineral water are displayed at the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Bottled mineral water are displayed at the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia...more

Bottled mineral water are displayed at the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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Bottled mineral water from Borjomi is seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi is seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties...more

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi is seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties...more

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties...more

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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Labels are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Labels are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia...more

Labels are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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Employees drive forklifts at a warehouse of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Employees drive forklifts at a warehouse of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia...more

Employees drive forklifts at a warehouse of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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An employee works at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

An employee works at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia...more

An employee works at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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An employee walks at the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

An employee walks at the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it...more

An employee walks at the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
Close
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Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties...more

Bottled mineral water from Borjomi are seen at the production line of the IDS Borjomi Georgia's factory in the town of Borjomi, some 150 km (93 miles) southwest of Tbilisi, January 30, 2013. If there's a secret to taking the bitter taste out of ties between Russia and Georgia after a 2008 war, it may lie in this lush valley south of the Caucasus Mountain border between the feuding former Soviet republics. The valley is the source of Borjomi, a salty, sulphurous mineral water that was popular in Russia since Soviet times but was swept off shelves when Moscow banned imports of Georgian beverages in 2006, with tensions already building toward war. Picture taken January 30. To match story GEORGIA-RUSSIA/TALKS REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili
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