Edition:
United States

Working conditions in Bangladesh

Share Slideshow

Marium, 16, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, lies on a bed at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Marium, 16, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, lies on a bed at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
1 / 35

Workers sort clothes at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh, June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers sort clothes at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh, June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
2 / 35

A worker carries a stack of clothes in a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh, June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A worker carries a stack of clothes in a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh, June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
3 / 35

A stack of clothes is seen at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh, June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A stack of clothes is seen at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh, June 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
4 / 35

Mustafizur (L) tries to comfort his wife Rebecca, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 3, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Mustafizur (L) tries to comfort his wife Rebecca, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 3, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
5 / 35

Karuna Akter Lima, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, sits on a bed at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Karuna Akter Lima, 20, a garment worker rescued from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, sits on a bed at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
6 / 35

Jesmin, a 25-year-old survivor from the collapsed Rana Plaza Building, lies on a bed at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed in Savar, Bangladesh, June 4, 2013. Jesmin suffers from a spinal injury and is waiting for surgery. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Jesmin, a 25-year-old survivor from the collapsed Rana Plaza Building, lies on a bed at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed in Savar, Bangladesh, June 4, 2013. Jesmin suffers from a spinal injury and is waiting for surgery. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
7 / 35

A relative pours water on 25-year-old Rojina's head at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed in Savar, Bangladesh, June 4, 2013. Rescue workers, who pulled Rojina from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, had to amputate part of her arm to rescue her. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A relative pours water on 25-year-old Rojina's head at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed in Savar, Bangladesh, June 4, 2013. Rescue workers, who pulled Rojina from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, had to amputate part of her arm to rescue her. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
8 / 35

A worker helps his colleague to lift a bucket of limestone as they work in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A worker helps his colleague to lift a bucket of limestone as they work in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
9 / 35

A man works in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A man works in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
10 / 35

A worker's sandals are seen inside a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A worker's sandals are seen inside a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
11 / 35

Ainul Huq, 55, (R) and Bulbul Hossain, 25, describe the condition of their lungs inside a village house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. According to Huq and Hossain, they are sufferers of silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust as they used to work in a stone crushing factory for few years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Ainul Huq, 55, (R) and Bulbul Hossain, 25, describe the condition of their lungs inside a village house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. According to Huq and Hossain, they are sufferers of silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust as they used to work in a stone crushing factory for few years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
12 / 35

Montu Mia, 40, describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Montu Mia says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust, as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Montu Mia, 40, describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Montu Mia says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust, as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
13 / 35

Montu Mia, 40, lies on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Montu Mia says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Montu Mia, 40, lies on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house in Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Montu Mia says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
14 / 35

Kamal Hossain, 28, sits on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Hossain says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Kamal Hossain, 28, sits on a bed as he describes the condition of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Hossain says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for five years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
15 / 35

A worker crushes locally grown tobacco in a grinding machine in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A worker crushes locally grown tobacco in a grinding machine in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
16 / 35

Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
17 / 35

A child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
18 / 35

Karim, 7, poses for a photograph as he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Karim, 7, poses for a photograph as he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
19 / 35

Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
20 / 35

Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
21 / 35

A child packs up cigarettes in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A child packs up cigarettes in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
22 / 35

Pari, 6, fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco as she works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Pari, 6, fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco as she works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
23 / 35

Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
24 / 35

Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. According to Uddin's family, he became sick as he used to work in a 'bidi' (cigarrette) factory for 8-10 years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 11, 2013. According to Uddin's family, he became sick as he used to work in a 'bidi' (cigarrette) factory for 8-10 years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
25 / 35

A worker crushes locally grown tobacco with a grinding machine in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A worker crushes locally grown tobacco with a grinding machine in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
26 / 35

A worker carries a bucket while he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A worker carries a bucket while he works in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh, July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
27 / 35

Rasheda, 15, who used to work for Abul Khair Steel Mills Ltd, stands outside a ward of the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Rasheda, 15, who used to work for Abul Khair Steel Mills Ltd, stands outside a ward of the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation in Dhaka, July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
28 / 35

Noor Alam, 23, a wounded worker, sits in his home near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Noor Alam, 23, a wounded worker, sits in his home near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
29 / 35

A key hangs round the neck of a worker in a common residence near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A key hangs round the neck of a worker in a common residence near a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
30 / 35

A worker welds part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A worker welds part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
31 / 35

Workers disembark from a boat as they return from part of a wrecked ship after work at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers disembark from a boat as they return from part of a wrecked ship after work at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
32 / 35

A man works inside a wrecked section of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

A man works inside a wrecked section of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
33 / 35

Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh, July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
34 / 35

Momin Ali, 26, shows an x-ray film of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Ali says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust, as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for two and half years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Momin Ali, 26, shows an x-ray film of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh, July 9, 2013. Ali says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust, as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for two and half years. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj

Close
35 / 35

All Collections

Police funerals in Baton Rouge

11:40am EDT

All Collections

Cold War ghosts haunt Latvia

11:05am EDT

All Collections

Froome wins Tour de France

10:51am EDT

All Collections

Air strikes in rebel-held Syria

10:35am EDT

All Collections

Frontlines of Libya

10:10am EDT

All Collections

Mourning for Munich

Saturday, July 23, 2016

All Collections

Munich shooting attack

Saturday, July 23, 2016

All Collections

Hillary chooses Kaine

Friday, July 22, 2016