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Gunfire and a ceasefire in Yemen

Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 02:31

Oct. 25 - Yemen's government signs a ceasefire with a dissident general to try to end weeks of worsening bloodshed. Deborah Lutterbeck reports.

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A call for a ceasefire amid Yemen unrest. In the Capitol city of Sanaa security forces open fire on a protest march killing two people and wounding scores more. Similar reports out of Taiz, where residents say five civilians including a child were killed in crossfire between state troops and opposition fighters. The bloodshed prompted the government to sign a ceasefire with a dissident general in an effort to stop the violence. A local field hospital is inundated with injured protesters. They keep pouring in for treatment SOUNDBITE: Wounded demonstrator, saying (Arabic): "We were walking in the street of al Zeraah. They (security) told us walk in peace, and when we arrived, to the area (al Ga'a), they besieged us from behind, and a military vehicle sprayed us from the front, and then we were fired upon by bullets. They opened fire, threw stones at us, fired tear gas, water," A government official says the deal between President Ali Abdullah Saleh's government and breakaway General Ali Mohsen took effect Tuesday afternoon. Several previous truce accords have failed to hold. A political standoff between Saleh and a scattered coalition of protesters escalated last month into bloody confrontations between government troops and dissident soldiers and tribesman. The latest agreement comes four days after a United Nations Security Council resolution condemned the violence in Yemen and urged Saleh to sign an initiative brokered by Gulf neighbors that would see him leave office after 32 years. More than a dozen people have been killed since then. Deborah Lutterbeck, Reuters

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Gunfire and a ceasefire in Yemen

Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 02:31