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Tunisia's new government calls for partners and peace

Friday, October 28, 2011 - 02:42

Oct. 28 - Tunisia's new leader and head of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party, Rachid Ghannouchi, says his party will seek partners and seek peace. Deborah Lutterbeck reports

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With the votes all counted in Tunisia's landmark elections, Rachid Ghannouchi, the leader of Tunisia's Islamist Ennahda party, outlines his party's plans for government. SOUNDBITE: Rachid Ghannouchi, the leader of Tunisia's Islamist Ennahda party, saying (Arabic): "Ennahda Movement emphasizes the cultural and strategic significance of our land in the region and the Arab and Muslim worlds, especially our relationship with Libya and Algeria. We also emphasize significance of openness to the outside world starting with Europe in order to restore our country's missing role in the Euro Mediterranean region and to support our country's relations with our European partners and the historical relationship with the U.S. Our movement is committed to supporting all peace efforts in the world," . At a news conference, the winner of the first election after the "Arab Spring" uprisings said his parties' aims are peaceful. He appealed for calm in the town that launched the "Arab Spring" as government offices came under attack in the place where 10 months ago a vegetable seller set fire to himself in despair and launched a revolution. SOUNDBITE: Rachid Ghannouchi, the leader of Tunisia's Islamist Ennahda party, saying (Arabic): "We are calling on this city and the people of this city who always played a significant role in Tunisian revolutions throughout history. We call on them and say you should be concerned over the revolution as you are the ones who started it. Therefore, we are calling for calm and protecting properties and souls." Ennahda has tried to reassure secularists by stressing it will not impose a Muslim moral code. The Ennahda party, which was banned for decades, will lead Tunisia's new government after an election victory likely to set a template for other Middle Eastern states rocked by uprisings this year. Deborah Lutterbeck, Reuters

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Tunisia's new government calls for partners and peace

Friday, October 28, 2011 - 02:42