Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

Video

Hong Kong graft probe detail emerges

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 00:48

April 25 - Reuters source reveals details of former top public servant's link to corruption inquiry involving the billionaire Kwok brothers. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS CONVERTED 4:3 MATERIAL ROUGH CUT - NO REPORTER NARRATION Hong Kong's graft buster is looking into payments totaling more than $2.5 million to former chief secretary Rafael Hui, seen here in file footage, as part of the city's corruption investigation involving two billionaire brothers who run Asia's largest property developer. A source with knowledge of the inquiry says the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) is investigating payments to Hui, linked to Sun Hung Kai Properties, the powerful conglomerate run by Raymond and Thomas Kwok. According to the source, a series of payments before and after Hui's time in office worth more than $2.5 million went to Hui from a Kwok-related entity. These payments are among several key transactions that are part of the investigation, said the source. The payments cited by the Reuters source reveal for the first time precise information linking Hui to the Kwok investigation. Hui and the Kwok brothers were arrested on suspicion of corruption on March 29, and released on bail without charges being filed. The brothers have denied any wrongdoing. The ICAC arrested Sun Hung Kai Properties executive director Thomas Chan, and four other people in March as part of the same investigation into allegations of bribery and misconduct in public office. They were also released on bail. The arrests sent a shock through Hong Kong's business community, a small, interconnected group of tycoon-led families that control much of the city's business operations and hold heavy political influence.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Hong Kong graft probe detail emerges

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 00:48