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Murdoch concedes 'cover up' but rejects blame

Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 02:27

April 26 - In a second day of testimony before an inquiry into press standards in Britain, media tycoon Rupert Murdoch paints a picture of a rogue culture at his defunct Sunday tabloid News of the World. Matt Cowan reports.

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Admittedly fallible. Obviously irritable, but he insists, not ultimately culpable. Appearing before the Leveson inquiry into press standards in the UK for a second day, Rupert Murdoch was questioned about the hacking scandal that led to the demise of his News of the World tabloid. SOUNDBITE: ROBERT JAY, LEVESON INQUIRY LEAD COUNSEL, SAYING (English): "Did it stop at one individual, the one rogue reporter, or was it more prevalent? It was within News International's power to ascertain that, wasn't it?" SOUNDBITE: Rupert Murdoch, News Corp. CEO saying (English): "I think the senior executives, who were all informed and I..er...were all mis-informed, and shielded from anything that was going on there and I do blame one or two people for that, who perhaps I shouldn't name, because for all I know they may be arrested yet, but there's no question in my mind that maybe even the editor, but certainly beyond that someone took charge of a cover-up, which we were a victim to and I regret." The 81-year-old media tycoon was at turns contrite... SOUNDBITE: Rupert Murdoch, News Corp. CEO saying (English): "I also have to say that I failed." and combative. SOUNDBITE: ROBERT JAY, LEVESON INQUIRY LEAD COUNSEL, SAYING (English): "Some might say this picture is consistent with a desire to cover up rather than expose..." SOUNDBITE: Rupert Murdoch, News Corp. CEO saying (English): "Well to people with minds like yours, yes. I'm sorry, I take that back." Admitting the ordeal was a blot on his reputation, he argued he was not directly responsible. SOUNDBITE: NEWS CORP CHIEF EXECUTIVE RUPERT MURDOCH SAYING (English): "There was no attempt either at my level or several levels below me to cover it up." He said he'd panicked when he closed down News of the World, but he was glad he did. At one point, Murdoch apologized for relating details of a personal conversation in a public forum. He complained of being mobbed and harassed by journalists and paparazzi. At a inquiry sparked by phone hacking at one of his tabloids, this was a mogul pining for a simpler, less invasive time. Matt Cowan, Reuters.

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Murdoch concedes 'cover up' but rejects blame

Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 02:27