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50 years after "I Have a Dream," the struggle continues

Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 02:43

Aug. 22 - It's been 50 years since iconic civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his ''I Have a Dream Speech.'' Although a lot of progress has been made, the struggle continues. Linda So reports.

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50 years ago, here on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, history was made. Nats: Crowd singing "We are not afraid." People from all over the country gathered in the nation's capital to listen to Martin Luther King Junior deliver his "I Have a Dream" speech. Nats: Crowds walking to Mall A crowd of more than 200,000 filled the Mall, stretching from the Washington Monument down to the Lincoln Memorial. Nats: MLK giving speech in Alabama Prior to the March on Washington, the iconic civil rights leader led a movement through the South, fighting for racial equality. Many times with his own safety at risk, having to dodge rocks hurled at him. Nats: Crowd singing on the Mall Despite the progress that's been made over the decades, the fight still continues. U.S. Representative John Lewis, who spoke at the march on that historic day, says Dr. King's dream has yet to be fulfilled. SOUNDBITE: REPRESENTATIVE JOHN LEWIS, A DEMOCRAT FROM GEORGIA, WHO WAS A COLLEGE STUDENT SPEAKER AT THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON, SAYING: "We have made some progress. We have come a distance, but we still have a distance to go. We still have roads to travel. It was a march for jobs and freedom. There's hundreds and thousands and millions of our brothers and sisters without jobs 50 years later." King's speech served as a catalyst for the civil rights movement. But the recording of the speech is now closely guarded by his children and governors of his estate. They maintain tight control over the public use of the sound of his voice. Gladys Mitchell, who was there for the speech, remembers just how moving it was. SOUNDBITE: GLADYS MITCHELL, WHO ATTENDED THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON, SAYING: "But when Dr. King spoke, I mean that was it! He was fantastic! I have never heard another person deliver the way he did it on that particular day 50 years ago." Lee Allen Williams drove all the way from California to be there. SOUNDBITE: LEE ALLEN WILLIAMS, PARTICIPANT IN 1963 MARCH ON WASHINGTON, SAYING: "It was heartwarming for me, to see and to hear, and to have all of these different nationalities of people coming together." On these very steps where history was made, President Obama will mark the 50th anniversary of Dr. King's speech. He will speak from the exact spot where King's legacy began. For those who walk the steps today, it's an opportunity to look back and reflect. SOUNDBITE: SUZETTE HOLT, A VISITOR TO THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL SAYING : "I can just imagine just a sea of people, just marching peacefully, for what they knew was right in their hearts and just hoping to make a statement for everybody and it really has impacted all of us." An impact that can be felt decades later in the presence of his monument, which serves as a lasting reminder of everything he fought for.

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50 years after "I Have a Dream," the struggle continues

Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 02:43