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Americans react to Obama's plan on Syria

Wednesday, September 11, 2013 - 02:26

Sept. 11 - Mixed reactions from Americans as well as Syrians living in the States after Obama's announced the plans to take action against Syria. Sophia Soo reports.

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U.S. President Barack Obama addressed the nation and urged Americans to support his threat to use military force to neutralize Syria's chemical weapons if diplomacy fails. Syrians living in Los Angeles agree with Obama. (SOUNDBITE) (Arabic) ADNAN JAMMAL, FROM SYRIA, SAYING: "We see that a country like America should help the Syrian people get rid of this murderer, who has killed thousands of people and will not stop there, and is willing to kill millions of people." (SOUNDBITE) (English) FAWAZ AL HINDI, FROM SYRIA, SAYING: "Americans don't want to fight this war, that's fine, but let us have the weapons to fight this guy, to stop him from killing our kids and our families and destroying our country. That's enough, two and a half years is enough." In Los Angeles and New York, Americans have mixed feelings. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ALEX MILOVANOV, ON SYRIA ISSUE, SAYING: "War is a bad thing. It's simple but not the right solution." (SOUNDBITE) (English) JASON LAUTERJUNG, FROM CALIFORNIA, SAYING: "It's a difficult situation. I don't want to see another Iraq. I don't necessarily agree with what happened there. And I don't think it's necessarily the United States position to play police to the world." (SOUNDBITE) (English) FELICE CARSON, FROM NEW YORK CITY, SAYING: "Being the United States and I guess the world, the civilized world, together we should be standing up to say we don't accept genocide, we don't accept chemical warfare and if you do these things and support terrorism there will be grave and swift consequences." (SOUNDBITE) (English) GREG ANDREWS, FROM CALIFORNIA, SAYING: "Yeah, chemical warfare and nuclear warfare is not to be stood for. So I think if somebody is threatening it then we're to make a move to stop it, absolutely." Obama asked the U.S. Senate to put off a vote on his request for an authorization of military force to let the diplomacy play out. U.S. Republican Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky voiced his concern. (SOUNDBITE) (English) RAND PAUL, REPUBLICAN U.S. SENATOR FROM KENTUCKY, SAYING: "If the vote occurs, I will vote no and I encourage my colleagues to vote no as well. The president has not made a compelling case that American interests are at risk in Syria. The threshold for war should be a significant one." It is a far from certain whether Obama would win a vote in the restive Congress on the Syrian issue. A negative outcome would be a huge embarrassment for the president.

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Americans react to Obama's plan on Syria

Wednesday, September 11, 2013 - 02:26