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World offers aid for typhoon-ravaged Philippines

Tuesday, Nov 12, 2013 - 01:35

Nov. 12 - Aid and supplies flood into the Philippines to help speed up relief efforts after a typhoon killed an estimated 10,000 people in one city alone. Sarah Toms reports.

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Aid from all over the world floods into the central Philippines in the aftermath of a super typhoon. The country is overwhelmed by the scale of the devastation. More than 100 U.S. marines are in the Philippines to help relief efforts. They're helping hundreds of survivors in Tacloban's wrecked airport to leave on cargo planes bound for the capital Manila. (SOUNDBITE) (English) VOLUNTEER TEACHER FOR HEARING HANDICAP CHILDREN IN TACLOBAN FROM MISSOURI, USA, PAMELA WEISMAN, SAYING: "It's not a good idea for me to be here anymore, the fewer people that are here, the easier the relief will be, and I got to go tell my family I'm alive and there is no communication here at all." A U.S. aircraft carrier is also heading to the Philippines to speed up the distribution of food, medical supplies and water. It's carrying 7000 sailors and more than 80 aircraft. (SOUNDBITE) (English) USS ANTIETAM'S CAPTAIN THOMAS DISY, SAYING: "We think it's going to take about 48 to 72 hours. The weather is pretty bad out there so we're limited by seas and winds of that nature on how fast we can go. But we're going to go as fast as we possibly can and get there as soon as we can to help people in need." Japan has already dispatched a 25 member medical team but on Tuesday Tokyo pledged $10 million in aid for tents, blankets, food and water. Troops are also being dispatched. South Korea is providing $5 million in financial aid and a disaster relief team. About 660,000 people have been displaced. Many have no access to food, water or medicine...and must rely entirely on relief supplies to survive.

World offers aid for typhoon-ravaged Philippines

Tuesday, Nov 12, 2013 - 01:35

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