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Abductee's return opens old wounds

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 01:21

Nov. 20 - A South Korean man's return to his home village 40 years after his abduction by the North reopens old wounds. Paul Chapman reports.

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A South Korean fisherman's recent visit to his home village more than 40 years after his abduction by the North has opened old wounds among some of its other residents. Jeon Wook-pyo made a brief trip to Nongso after escaping through China. He was one of 17 fishermen from this small village to be abducted. Ok Chul-Soon, the wife of one of those still in the North, admits she harboured hopes that the escapee was her own husband. (SOUNDBITE) (Korean) 82-YEAR-OLD OK CHUL-SOON, WIFE OF ONE OF THE FISHERMEN WHO WAS ABDUCTED BY NORTH KOREA, SAYING: "It wasn't a nice feeling at all. I even cried as I heard that Wook-pyo had returned. I didn't say anything and walked out of the place." For those, like Kim Jeom-sun whose husband was also abducted, the pain is never-ending. (SOUNDBITE) (Korean) 82-YEAR-OLD KIM JEOM-SUN, WIFE OF ANOTHER FISHERMAN WHO WAS ABDUCTED BY NORTH KOREA, SAYING: "I've been always feeling sorry and longing for him. My house is near the road, so whenever I heard someone walking by, I though it was him. Whenever the door made some sounds, I thought it was him walking in my house. I've been living like this." South Korea says 516 of its nationals remain in the North after a spate of abductions after the Korean War that ended in 1953. Those who have made it back to the South say they were used for propaganda or intelligence gathering. North Korea says anyone on its territory is there voluntarily.

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Abductee's return opens old wounds

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 01:21