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Iran's Rouhani on charm offensive to win conservative support of nuclear deal

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - 01:47

Nov. 27 - Days after Iran reached a landmark nuclear agreement with world powers, President Hassan Rouhani's government goes on a charm offensive to shore up support from domestic conservative groups. Mana Rabiee reports.

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Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is on the charm offensive. It's just days after Iran reached a landmark interim nuclear agreement with world powers. Now, the government of this moderate president is shoring up support for the deal among conservatives and --- trying to silence critics. (SOUNDBITE) (Farsi) IRANIAN PRESIDENT, HASSAN ROUHANI, SAYING: "I want to assure our people that the principles set by people, the rights which belong to the people, the framework which the Supreme Leader has set, these will be applied until the end of the negotiations. Meaning that in the country, our nuclear right will be operational with more strength and clarity. Even the right of enrichment which is a part of our nuclear rights will continue." Under the deal, Iran will pull back on its nuclear program -- in exchange for limited relief from crippling sanctions. But to keep the deal on track, Rouhani's government must protect it from anti-Western hardliners and their powerful constituents. Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, just back from negotiating the agreement in Geneva, told parliament the deal was good for Iran. (SOUNDBITE) (Farsi) IRANIAN FOREIGN MINISTER, MOHAMMED JAVAD ZARIF, SAYING: "The other side has agreed to lift all the sanctions, has agreed for Iran to have enrichment, has agreed for Iran to have access to financial assets, has agreed to have nuclear cooperation with Iran, has agreed to provide Iran with modern facilities. What have we agreed? We have agreed not just to implement the Security Council's resolutions, but to study them." Iran's nuclear negotiators got a hero's welcome in Tehran and critics of the deal are mostly silent for now. But as political factions start to weigh the costs and benefits of the complex agreement, Iran's hardliners will be poised to pounce.

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Iran's Rouhani on charm offensive to win conservative support of nuclear deal

Wednesday, November 27, 2013 - 01:47