Reuters - Video

Edition: U.S. | U.K. | IN | CN | JP

Most Popular

Anti-nuclear sentiment strong three years after Japan's triple disaster.

Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - 00:53

Mar.11 - Protestors march in the city of Fukushima as anti-nuclear sentiment remains strong in Japan three years after the triple disaster which triggered the nation's worst nuclear crisis ever. Rough Cut. (No Reporter Narration).

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: Residents of Fukushima city rallied against nuclear power on the day, where the rest of the nation commemorated the victims of the triple disaster of March 11, 2011. A nine magnitude earthquake triggered a massive tsunami which hit a wide swathe of Japan's northeastern coastline, including Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant some 50 kilometers (31 miles) from the city. The tsunami destablised the three of the reactors at the plant, which then went into meltdown and triggered an evacuation order that forced more than 150,000 people from their homes in the surrounding region. On Tuesday (March 11) as many as 70 protesters, mostly Fukushima residents, put on the white coverall suits, a symbol of Japan's prolonged nuclear crisis, to rally against the country's unending nuclear reliance as they march on streets in Fukushima City, about 50-kilometers from the epicenter of the on-going nuclear crisis. Protests such as these are growing rarer in Japan even though the general sentiment against nuclear power grows. According to an NHK nationwide survey released on Monday (March 10), the number of Japanese who want to see a complete end to nuclear power has grown in the last couple years to 30 percent. If the figure includes those, who want to see Japan reduce its dependency on nuclear power, that number increases to 76 percent. Following the 2011 quake and tsunami, a series of explosions and meltdowns caused the world's worst nuclear accident for 25 years, spewing radiation over a swathe of Fukushima, an agricultural area long known for its rice, beef and peaches. A 30 km radius around the plant was declared a no-go zone, forcing some 160,000 people from homes where some had lived for generations, stirring up a nation-wide movement against nuclear power generation. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe angered Fukushima residents on Monday (March 10) by saying he will push through with plans to restart Japan's idled nuclear reactors. The Japanese government declared the reactors in a stable state called cold-shut down on December 2011, however the decommissioning of the four reactors at Fukushima Daiichi is likely to take decades and cost tens of billions of dollars.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Anti-nuclear sentiment strong three years after Japan's triple disaster.

Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - 00:53