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Cyber security after Snowden

Monday, May 12, 2014 - 02:23

May 12 - From retail disasters like the data theft at Target- to the Heartbleed internet threat this spring- to how U.S. companies deal with government requests for information about their clients- cyber security experts have a lot to say. Bobbi Rebell reports.

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The global surge in cyber crime and cyber threats is a hot topic. From retail disasters like the data theft at Target- to the Heartbleed internet threat this spring- to how U.S. companies deal with government requests for information about their clients- cyber security experts have a lot to say. Including retired general and former director of the CIA and NSA Michael Hayden, currently a principal at the Chertoff Group. SOUNDBITE: MICHAEL HAYDEN, PRINCIPAL, CHERTOFF GROUP (ENGLISH) SAYING: "I think we are just going to have to be a bit more transparent with regard to what we ask of industry and how much we ask of industry. So that industry in its own way can scale what it's doing based on these legal requests to both an American and an international audience. I mean the real issue is although these are American companies they are truly international companies as well- and they have a right- They have a right to protect their international identity too. And so the American government has to do what it can and there are limits here. But the American government has to do what it can to protect these industries images abroad." Another big topic- protecting the U.S. military's confidential information. Brigadeer General Paul Nakasone is Deputy Commander, Army Cyber Command: SOUNDBITE: BRIGADEER GENERAL. PAUL NAKASONE, DEPUTY COMMANDER, ARMY CYBER COMMAND (ENGLISH) SAYING: "What really concerns us today is the destructive capabilities that malware might bring to our networks. Think about what could be done if suddenly the data on our computers is wiped clean. That we couldn't access our networks so these destructive capabilities is what, for our perspective, holds the most concern as we move towards the future." In the wake of the Target data breach many retailers are just starting to open their eyes to their vulnerability- says Leonard Moodispaw, CEO of KEYW. SOUNDBITE: LEONARD MOODISPAW, CEO, KEYW (ENGLISH) SAYING: "Whether before that it was naiveté that they didn't or they were in denial, they are now talking about it more. Realizing that despite all the products they bought and all the efforts they made they still have serious problems with advanced persistent threats. I think my greatest concern is just that awareness of it. Willingness to do something about it as opposed to pulling the covers over their head and hoping it doesn't happen to them." The Target cyber attack last December involved at least 40 million payment card numbers and 70 million other pieces of customer data. Just last week the CEO of Target was removed from his job.

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Cyber security after Snowden

Monday, May 12, 2014 - 02:23