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Qatar 2022: what happens now?

Monday, June 02, 2014 - 02:15

June 2 - The vote for the hosting of the 2022 World Cup could be re-run if corruption allegations surrounding Qatar's winning campaign are proved to be accurate. As Ivor Bennett reports allegations made in a British newspaper could prove costly.

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It was a decision that shocked football. A desert nation without any stadia awarded the 2022 World Cup. Qatar's bid has been dogged by controversy ever since then - FIFA officials admitting temperatures of 50 degrees would mean moving the event to winter. But it now may not happen at all - allegations of corruption prompting calls for a re-vote. English Football Association Chairman, Greg Dyke. SOUNDBITE (English) FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION CHAIRMAN, GREG DYKE, SAYING: "If the evidence is there that the process was corrupt then the evidence has to be looked at again." A revote would involve America, Australia, South Korea and Japan But it may not be that simple. Voting for 2022 was done in tandem with the 2018 tournament. Although Russia won the vote, it may have be held again too according to sports lawyer Kevin Carpenter. SOUNDBITE (English) KEVIN CARPENTER, SPORTS LAWYER, HILL DICKINSON, SAYING: "It would depend on the evidence of corruption. If it were shown that votes had been swapped for example, against the FIFA code of ethics, then there may be a way to reopen that procedure as well. But whichever way FIFA go with this I think they're going to lose out in someway be it through sponsorship contrasting, broadcasting or just through the hosting itself. The allegations of corruption centre on this man - Qatari former FIFA executive Mohamed Bin Hammam. According to a British newspaper, he paid a total of 5 million dollars to officials in return for their votes. Qatar denies the claims, insisting Bin Hammam had nothing to do with their bid. SOUNDBITE (English) KEVIN CARPENTER, SPORTS LAWYER, HILL DICKINSON, SAYING: "There is a provision in the hosting agreement for any disputes to be dealt with through arbitration. But if a rerun was to be done they'd want to actually get that stopped. So I would an injunction would be the most likely way they would go down, because of course spent a significant amount of money already on the basis they had from when the vote was cast to 2022, which a long period of time and they've already started building the stadiums and the infrastructure. So legally they'd be looking to recoup some of that money." Qatar was expected to spend as much as 200 billion dollars hosting the event, 60 times more than South Africa did in 2010.

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Qatar 2022: what happens now?

Monday, June 02, 2014 - 02:15