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Where next for Cameron over EU?

Monday, June 30, 2014 - 02:05

British Prime Minister David Cameron insists he will be able to do business with Jean-Claude Juncker despite objecting to his nomination for President of the European Commission. Joanna Partridge looks at the fallout from the row and asks if the UK is now more likely to leave the EU?

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Back to Britain and facing criticism . Prime Minister David Cameron forced a vote on Jean-Claude Juncker's nomination as European Commission president - and lost it 26-2. SOUNDBITE: David Cameron, British Prime Minister, saying (English): "The nomination has been decided and must be accepted. It is important that the Council did at least agree to review and reconsider how to handle the next appointment of the next Commission president the next time this happens and that is set out in the Council conclusions. Mr Speaker, the turning to the future, we must work with the Commission president, as we always do, to secure our national interest." Cameron was also asked whether Britain has any allies left in Europe. And his negotiating tactics were criticised by the leader of the opposition Labour party, Ed Miliband. SOUNDBITE: Ed Miliband, Labour leader, saying (English): "He started with a divided Europe over the Juncker candidacy and ended with a united Europe against him." Cameron called Juncker over the weekend to congratulate him - and to build bridges. The European Commission president nominee said he was committed to finding solutions for Britain's concerns. The choice of Juncker is now expected to drive Britain closer to leaving the EU. Cameron had already promised a referendum on membership in 2017, provided he's re-elected next year. At home, he's trying to counter the popularity for the anti-EU party UKIP. That puts him in a tough position, says Simon Derrick from Bank of NY Mellon. SOUNDBITE: Simon Derrick, Chief FX Strategist, Bank of NY Mellon, saying (English): "There's been a growing disillusionment with the European Union amongst the UK population over the last few years and David Cameron was clearly expressing that dissatisfaction, so from the perspective of: was he doing the right thing? Absolutely he was doing the right thing. Can we patch it up? Well of course there is always the ability to patch things up." It seems London still has at least one, influential, fan in Europe. German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble told the Financial Times the EU would be "not acceptable" without Britain, and Germany would do all it can to keep the UK in. That kind of support may be sorely needed when Britain looks to renegotiate its relationship with the bloc.

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Where next for Cameron over EU?

Monday, June 30, 2014 - 02:05