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Brazil police disperse World Cup protesters with tear gas, pepper spray

Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 00:56

A protest against the lavish spending for the World Cup is dispersed by police with tear gas and pepper spray. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) Police in Brazil's Rio de Janeiro fired tear gas and pepper spray to disperse demonstrators who had been protesting on Sunday (July 13) against the lavish spending for the World Cup. The protest near the Maracana stadium, where Germany will meet Argentina for the World Cup final later on Sunday, started out peacefully. But when the protest grew in size, and demonstrators started marching up and down the street near Praca Saens Pena, police used tear gas and pepper spray to disperse them. Police in riot gear, many on foot, some on horseback outnumbered the protesters who have been demanding better health and education and criticising the amount of money spent on the month-long tournament. Before the police intervened, around 200 anti-World Cup protesters were marching through Saens Pena neighborhood. Teachers, health workers and students made up the bulk of the protest, mobilized as part of the city's largest ever security operation, planned especially for the day of the final. Many different groups integrated in the protest with the aim of giving voice to those who have lost out on the benefits from the hosting of the World Cup in Brazil, and those have been directly disadvantaged. Community groups, for example, protested against violence in the favelas, feeling that certain policing operations have been timed strategically in order to control the favelas under the eyes of international media, rather than to make them safer for those living there. Others marched demanding improved health and education systems, which, they claim, would have benefited from a share of the $11 billion of public money spent on the month-long soccer tournament Many of the demands heard in the protests have not changed a great deal since the large scale protests which swept the streets during the Confederations Cup in 2013. However, the recent protests have in general seen fewer cases of vandalism, with greater organization between the groups and their particular demands, showing a degree of progression after the initial breaking of the silence last year.

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Brazil police disperse World Cup protesters with tear gas, pepper spray

Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 00:56