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France marks 100 year anniversary of WW1 on Bastille Day

Monday, Jul 14, 2014 - 01:13

French and foreign troops march down the Champs Elysee in Paris, marking 100 years since the start of World War One on Bastille Day. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: France marked the centenary of World War One on Monday (July 14) with its traditional military parade and soldiers from belligerent countries of the Great War. The parade kicked off with two lines of French soldiers wearing 1914-style uniforms marching into the square, followed by military representatives from all the countries who took part in the fighting. In a war fought largely on their home soil, about 8.4 million French soldiers served and about 1.3 million were killed in battles that transformed familiar place names such as Verdun and the Chemin des Dames into bywords for horror and suffering. The last French veteran who fought in WWI died in 2008. For the special anniversary commemoration of Bastille Day, 76 foreign armies which fought during the Great War were invited to walk down the famous Paris avenue carrying their own flags and insignia. Always a crowd favorite, an aerobatic display team made of nine Alpha-jets from the French air force flew overhead, trailing smoke in the colors of the French flag - red, white and blue. Some 3,752 men and women, 76 dogs and 241 horses participated in the parade. Celebrations are held on July 14 across France every year to mark the storming of France's most notorious prison at the beginning of the 1789 revolution, which saw the French Queen, Marie Antoinette and hundreds of other guillotined in the Place de la Concorde square -- then known as Place de la Revolution. In Paris, festivities are set to continue with fireworks lighting up the city skyline on Monday evening.

France marks 100 year anniversary of WW1 on Bastille Day

Monday, Jul 14, 2014 - 01:13

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