Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

Business

Fighting for the undecided in Scotland

Monday, August 18, 2014 - 02:28

There's a month to go until Scotland votes whether to become independent from the rest of the UK. Support for the campaign has risen slightly but many voters are still undecided, unsure how independence could affect their jobs. Joanna Partridge reports

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

Just a month to go until Scotland's independence referendum and some are voting with their stomachs. Cuckoo's Bakery in Edinburgh is conducting its own opinion poll - with referendum cupcakes. Co-Owner Graham Savage says customers can cast their vote, buying a cake for yes, no or undecided. They believe they'll sell 10,000 by September 18th. SOUNDBITE: Graham Savage, Co-Owner of Cuckoo's Bakery, saying (English): "Customers are really engaged, they're coming in, they're chatting to us about their opinion and about the cakes and they're also talking to each other. So table-to-table people are kind of looking over to see what other people are eating." Cake sales have been broadly in line with opinion polls. The latest show support for independence has risen slighty in the last month but the No vote is still ahead. Leader of the Yes campaign, Alex Salmond, failed to win a high-profile TV debate. He's trying to convince undecided voters, now estimated at between 12% to 14%. SOUNDBITE: Alex Salmond, Leader of the pro-independence campaign and Scottish First Minister, saying (English): "To secure our national health service, secondly to stop the assault on the poor in Scotland, the people with disabilities, children and families, which is happening through the social security changes. And thirdly and I think the most important aspect of all is a declaration to create an opportunity for Scotland's young people." An independent Scotland's currency has been the focus of much debate. The UK's main political parties have ruled out a formal currency union if the "Yes" camp wins. Alistair Darling, former British finance minister and leader of the Better Together anti-independence campaign, has called Salmond's plan to use the pound "come what may" irresponsible. Being in the UK has other advantages too, says Better Together spokesman David Whitton. SOUNDBITE: David Whitton, Better Together spokesman, saying (English): "The Union of England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland has lasted for three hundred and seven years and we get the safety, security and stability of being part of the UK as well as the strength of the UK wrapped around us." Economic concerns dominate for many voters, says Alastair McCaig from IG. SOUNDBITE: Alastair McCaig, Market analyst, IG, saying (English): "Far too many people will have their jobs affected by a vote of yes, and I think as much as we're seeing the margins tighten as we get ever closer to the actual deadline date, I think in reality the chances are still very much stacked in the No." People not living in Scotland can't vote, but that doesn't stop them expressing their views. Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott the latest to stir debate by saying Scotland going it alone wouldn't be in the world's best interests.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Fighting for the undecided in Scotland

Monday, August 18, 2014 - 02:28