Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

Finance Videos

Greenpeace wins war on Lego/Shell tie-up

Friday, October 10, 2014 - 02:02

Greenpeace notches up a viral victory over Lego and Shell's long association with a video depicting Lego toy figures drowning in an Arctic oil spill. Melanie Ralph reports.

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

Copyright info re Lego film : No archive, no sales, for news use only, free for news use until 10th November 2014, for any further use please contact Greenpeace on 0207 865 8122 Lego is finding itself in the middle of an environmental crusade. Greenpeace is using its figures to make a video condemning Shell ... and it's gone viral. The toymaker is in contract with the energy giant sponsoring Lego kits and selling them in petrol stations. But now the 50-year marriage is heading for divorce. Lego insists it isn't to do with the Greenpeace video and their contract with Shell will continue until it expires at an unknown date. But Greenpeace campaigner, Ian Duff, says their video got an overwhelming response from the public. SOUNDBITE (English) GREENPEACE CAMPAIGNER, IAN DUFF, SAYING: ''The objective of that video was to reach out to millions of people and almost six million people have seen that video, and a million people have taken action as a result of it. What we wanted to do is grab people's attention and to bring this issue to the top of their mind and encourage them to take action, and that's what they did.'' For their latest tie-up, Shell and Lego linked up in 2011 in a deal reportedly in the region of £68 million. The Greenpeace campaign started to target that relationship in a three-month campaign which included the viral video. Brand Equity's Robert Haigh says the Lego brand will easily weather the storm. SOUNDBITE (English) ROBERT HAIGH, BRAND EQUITY, SAYING: ''The Lego brand is growing hugely year on year, added $100 million in brand value last year and the loss of the Shell partnership at some point in the future isn't necessarily going to be hugely problematic for them because of their present strength.'' This isn't the first time Greenpeace have targeted big brands to get at companies they think are damaging the environment. After another high-profile campaign in 2011, toy-maker Mattel stopped using Asia Pulp and Paper for their Barbie doll packaging. Greenpeace claimed APP's business destroys Indonesia's rainforest. Lego may be unhappy to be caught in the middle of the latest Greenpeace campaign. Other big brands will no doubt be checking their corporate partnerships to make sure they remain the ones watching the campaign videos - and not the ones being watched.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Greenpeace wins war on Lego/Shell tie-up

Friday, October 10, 2014 - 02:02